A correctional officer(s) chained up an inmate by himself then brought in another inmate and let him attack the chained inmate.

Asked over 1 year ago - Saint Johns, AZ

I was asked to check with lawyers what this inmate should do, he was taken in to a cell alone then chained up so he couldn't move and then the guard brought another inmate in to beat him up and after that he was stabbed in the jaw with a weapon of some sort by the other inmate and the guard/guards didn't do anything they just let it happen on purpose, this is in an Arizona facility. and if I understood correctly there is some photographic evidence i'm not sure if its video or photos though. he clearly needs protection some how because the guards are making this happen for some reason, the victim is in prison for possession of stolen property. what type of lawyer does he need? he mentioned a civil lawyer but i'm not at all sure what avenues to take? or whom I should contact? about this.help

Attorney answers (1)

  1. Judy A Lutgring

    Contributor Level 8

    Answered . Contact an attorney who litigates in the area of civil rights. You don't have a day to waste. The surveillance videos that may have captured pieces of the story may not be stored for very long at all before being taped over, and an attorney can make the proper requests to preserve the evidence. The lawyer will want to know exactly which facility this occurred at and when. A law enforcement agency should investigate this, but not necessarily the one providing corrections officers at that facility. If it is a state facility, my inclination would be to contact the FBI. The communications between the inmate and you have probably been recorded. If your friend is inventing part of this story, that would be very serious. If you can't find a civil rights attorney, try getting a recommendation for a lawyer who might handle it from someone at the local public defender office, or call the attorney who originally represented him. That lawyer might be able to arrange a quick attorney/client call or visit with the inmate without delay and without danger of being recorded. Good luck.

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