Marion County Guardianship Attorneys — 7 found

Lawyers with

Avvo Rating

1.0 to 10.0


  1. Marion County Guardianship Law Attorney Christopher David Hamilton

    Christopher Hamilton

    I help familes use education law and guardianship to protect loved ones with developmental and age-related disabilities. I also help families explore and access other legal tools to... more
    Licensed for 3 years - Contingent (33%)
    AVVO
    RATING

    7.7

  2. Marion County Guardianship Law Attorney Michelle Vlach-Ing

    Michelle Vlach-Ing

    Michelle has over 19 years experience in the legal profession and over fourteen years experience as an attorney in the private practice of law in Oregon. Her legal career began in 1995... more
    Licensed for 14 years - $200-$300/hour
    AVVO
    RATING

    9.4

  3. Marion County Guardianship Law Attorney Ryan Edward Gibb

    Ryan Gibb

    Salem, OR Guardianship Law Attorney
    Licensed for 18 years
    Not yet reviewed
    AVVO
    RATING

    8.6

  4. Marion County Guardianship Law Attorney Sean K Downey

    Sean Downey

    Salem, OR Guardianship Law Attorney
    Licensed for 8 years - $200/hour
    Not yet reviewed
    AVVO
    RATING

    6.2

  5. Marion County Guardianship Law Attorney Jill Francine Foster

    Jill Foster

    Salem, OR Guardianship Law Attorney
    Licensed for 21 years
    Not yet reviewed
    AVVO
    RATING

    6.7

  6. Marion County Guardianship Law Attorney James R Huddleston

    James Huddleston

    Salem, OR Guardianship Law Attorney
    Licensed for 4 years - $125-$150/hour
    Not yet reviewed
    AVVO
    RATING

    5.9

  7. Marion County Guardianship Law Attorney Stephanie M. Palmblad

    Stephanie Palmblad

    Stephanie focuses her practice in the areas of wills, trusts, contested case guardianship and conservatorship, probate and trust administration and trust litigation.Stephanie joined... more
    Licensed for 3 years - $135-$300/hour
    Not yet reviewed
    AVVO
    RATING

    6.1

Guardianship

When a person is too young to make decisions or is incapacitated and can no longer care for their own interests, guardian law allows the court to appoint someone to make legal and welfare decisions for them. A legal guardian may be appointed as a limited decision-maker or an all-purpose decision-maker. For example, children whose parents are divorcing often have limited legal guardians help decide custody issues. Nursing home residents may need a general legal guardian to make all their welfare decisions for them. Guardianship lawyers advise you about the appropriate legal guardianship for your particular circumstances. They also help with guardianship forms and other legal paperwork, and represent the guardian once one is appointed.