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Timothy Murphy Phillips

Timothy Phillips’s Legal Cases

6 total

  • People of the State of California vs. B.G.

    Practice Area:
    Criminal Defense
    Date:
    Jun 07, 2010
    Outcome:
    Case dismissed due to insufficient evidence
    Description:
    B.G. was one of more than 60 activists arrested for allegedly participating in an open occupation of a UC Berkeley building as a form of political protest. He allegedly received a notice of exclusion ordering him to stay away from the UC Berkeley campus for seven days, and allegedly re-entered the campus with a protest sign two days later. He was arrested for campus disruption, a misdemeanor. Tim Phillips negotiated with the Deputy District Attorney, who originally offered B.G. three years of court probation and a fine. Through his advocacy, Mr. Phillips convinced the Deputy District Attorney to dismiss the case. Attorney Paula Crow stated that Mr. Phillips's "generous contribution" in defending B.G. was "an inspiration."
  • AFS Assignee of Washington Mutual Bank K vs. M.B.

    Practice Area:
    Litigation
    Date:
    Aug 04, 2009
    Outcome:
    Default judgment set aside and case dismissed
    Description:
    M.B. was unaware of any debt he owed to Washington Mutual, but an assignee of Washington Mutual filed a lawsuit against him for damages for breach of contract and common counts, interest on the damages, and attorneys' fees. M.B. did not receive proper service of the lawsuit and lacked actual notice of the suit in time to defend himself. As a result, a default judgment was entered against him. Tim Phillips filed a successful motion to vacate the default judgment. Mr. Phillips then sought proof that the debt actually existed. This request prompted the assignee of Washington Mutual to dismiss the case.
  • Christopher Hanson vs. Swank Audio Visuals

    Practice Area:
    Discrimination
    Date:
    Mar 27, 2012
    Outcome:
    Settled for $80,000
    Description:
    Swank Audio Visuals employed Christopher Hanson from February 2010 until April 2011, when Swank terminated Mr. Hanson due to his psoriasis. Tim Phillips and attorney Jessica Juarez represented Mr. Hanson in a lawsuit for monetary damages. The case is described further in the following news article: http://www.sfbg.com/2011/05/17/fear-beard
  • C.H. vs. M.R.

    Practice Area:
    Personal Injury
    Date:
    Aug 10, 2011
    Outcome:
    Resolved
    Description:
    C.H. was riding her bicycle in Golden Gate Park when M.R.'s vehicle struck her. The San Francisco police concluded that the collision was caused by M.R. driving her vehicle forward at a stop sign before such movement could be made with reasonable safety. Tim Phillips and attorney Ben Rosenfeld represented C.H. in a lawsuit for monetary damages.
  • Communities United Against Police Brutality v. City of Minneapolis

    Practice Area:
    Litigation
    Date:
    May 16, 2013
    Outcome:
    Prevailed on summary judgment motion
    Description:
    In October 2012, CUAPB asked the City of Minneapolis to provide it with a list of all complaints filed with the Civilian Review Authority (CRA), including the name of each complainant and his or her contact information, for a period of 28 months. Minneapolis provided the list, but did not include complainant contact information for complaints designated as pending or open. Tim Phillips initiated litigation on CUAPB's behalf. On May 16, 2013, Judge Sipkins agreed with Mr. Phillips that “the names of, and contact information for, complainants on pending and open CRA complaints is public information.”
  • State of Minnesota v. H.J.

    Practice Area:
    Criminal Defense
    Date:
    Jun 23, 2014
    Outcome:
    Case dismissed
    Description:
    Believing that a grocery store employee had given him expired food for free, H.J. walked past the registers without making any effort to pay for three packages of chicken. Minneapolis police officers arrested him for theft. On the first day his trial, he was also charged with violating the Minneapolis disorderly conduct ordinance, because he allegedly shouted when he was wrongfully accused of theft. Tim Phillips represented H.J. at trial. A Hennepin County jury returned a not guilty verdict as to the theft charge and a guilty verdict as to the disorderly conduct charge. Mr. Phillips promptly appealed the guilty verdict to the Court of Appeals. At the Court of Appeals, Mr. Phillips argued that the Minneapolis disorderly conduct ordinance must be narrowly construed so as not to criminalize constitutionally protected expression. He asserted that the trial court’s instructions to the jury, to which he had objected, did not fully protect H.J.’s right to freedom of speech. The Court of Appeals ruled in H.J.’s favor, holding that the trial court erred in refusing to instruct the jury as Mr. Phillips requested. The Court remanded the case for a new trial due to the jury instruction error. The prosecutor subsequently dismissed the case.