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Jason Wayne Anderson

Jason Anderson’s Answers

4 total

  • We lost a final summary judgment in a huge probate case where there was masssive fraud, do we need a appellate lawyer?

    My wife and I were in a huge probate case, named beneficiaries, wife named P.R., we were defending a will contest where estranged two 'kids' came out of the woodwork only to collect life ins. policy and hire huge law firm (after their first attny....

    Jason’s Answer

    You should consult appellate counsel as quickly as possible if the case was decided against you on summary judgment. An appellate practitioner will have sufficient experience with appeals to advise you regarding the likelihood of getting the summary judgment reversed.

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  • What kind of lawyer do I need?

    I am looking for an attorney that can help me out with an appeals case. This case has to do with a real estate/easement case in. I believe (as does my current lawyer) that the judge erred in judgement and failed to examine all the facts before g...

    Jason’s Answer

    A lawyer who handles civil appeals can help decide whether an appeal makes sense and, if so, to write and argue the appeal.

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  • Once the Court of Appeals issues a mandate that denied your appeal, Civil Rule 60(b) allows the litigant the opportunity to ...

    motion the trial court to vacate their previous judgment based upon mistakes, new evidence etc. Is that decision then appealable by either party?

    Jason’s Answer

    Yes, a decision on a CR 60 motion is appeal able regardless of a prior appeal.

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  • Civil Lawsuit Appeals

    Is it better to have a case reviewed before going to trial in a civil lawsuit for possible appeals or simply wait until after the outcome? It's a very complicated case that already has been dismissed in whole on MSJ and then appealed and rever...

    Jason’s Answer

    In a complex case, it is often beneficial to involve experienced appellate counsel before and during trial to evaluate and preserve issues for appeal. This practice is not uncommon.

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