Eric J Camm’s Answers

Eric J Camm

Seattle Business Attorney.

Contributor Level 12
  1. Can I create an online service based on gifts and honor instead of loans and equity without being regulated?

    Answered about 1 year ago.

    1. Athina Karamanlis Powers
    2. Eric J Camm
    3. Jamin Price Horn
    3 lawyer answers

    This is very similar to kickstarter. Bottom line is that when it comes to other people's money - there are a lot of regulations and pitfalls. You will need experienced legal counsel to help you out with this to avoid potential liability issues.

    3 lawyers agreed with this answer

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  2. Create a LLC, without having a physical address.

    Answered about 1 year ago.

    1. Jason M. Wells
    2. Eric J Camm
    3. John P Corrigan
    4. Brent D Harris
    4 lawyer answers

    Most states allow for an LLC to use a PO Box as a business address, but do require a physical address for the company's registered agent. There are numerous companies that will act as the registered agent for your company for $99-$199 per year. The registered agent is the individual or entity designated to accept legal service on behalf of the company. They are required and it must be a physical address. If you create your LLC using a PO Box as the company address, just make sure to...

    3 lawyers agreed with this answer

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  3. See details below where I rephrase my question.

    Answered over 1 year ago.

    1. Eric J Camm
    2. Gregory Philip Bowes
    3. Robert P Dickson
    3 lawyer answers

    You'd want to look at RCW 9.73. I presume the relevant inquiry will come down to whether or not the open meetings being held by the BOD would count as "private" communications as defined in the statute. Without more information about the nature of the meeting it may be difficult to get a definitive answer.

    1 lawyer agreed with this answer

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  4. Do I need to expand to an LLC?

    Answered over 1 year ago.

    1. Eric J Camm
    2. Frank Anthony Natoli
    3. John P Corrigan
    3 lawyer answers

    You should incorporate any business that you are running in order to enjoy the liability protection afforded by the LLC structure. You could incorporate 1 LLC and register multiple DBA's, or you could incorporate 2 separate LLCs and keep the businesses separate. The bottom line, however, is that as a sole proprietorship you are risking your personal assets because you have personal liability for the obligations of the company. By incorporating you can create a level of separation between...

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  5. Can a private start-up issue restricted stocks to consultants/advisors similar to issuing them to employees?

    Answered 12 months ago.

    1. Eric J Camm
    2. Craig Trent Byrnes
    3. Dana Howard Shultz
    4. James Daniel Houston
    4 lawyer answers

    You should retain an attorney in San Francisco to help you out with this. Exempt securities offerings are complex and if you are contemplating issuing restricted securities in lieu of compensation to third parties then there are a number of tax related issues that will have to be dealt with as well. I'd set up a consultation with an experienced business attorney in San Francisco that works on Securities related matters.

    3 lawyers agreed with this answer

  6. I'm the owner of a recently incorporated C-Company in Delaware, why should I hire an attorney?

    Answered 12 months ago.

    1. Kenneth Allyn Sprang
    2. John P Corrigan
    3. Eric J Camm
    3 lawyer answers

    I agree with the previous answers in terms of the scope of different issues that may be identified by working with experienced counsel. Generally, a lawyer who works with start ups will be able to help you establish the framework for how your company is governed, set the terms for the founders (buy/sell agreements, right of first refusal, etc.), and assist with establishing a good dispute resolution protocol so that in the event there are any disagreements early on - they do not paralyze your...

    3 lawyers agreed with this answer

  7. How can I remove a Director of my corporation?

    Answered about 1 year ago.

    1. James Adrian Cueva
    2. Eric J Camm
    3. Michael Charles Doland
    4. John P Corrigan
    5. Kenneth Allyn Sprang
    5 lawyer answers

    Generally the progression would be to look first towards the corporate governance documents of the corporation - and see what they say about removal of a Director. If that doesn't help - then move to the statute governing corporations in Florida to see what standards are in place for directors. I agree with the prior answer that you need to consult a business litigator to have them review the governance docs and provide some insight as to what your options are.

    3 lawyers agreed with this answer

  8. How to get out/around a no compete clause in cell phone business (kent/Columbus) Ohio

    Answered about 1 year ago.

    1. Donald Michael Gallick
    2. Frank Anthony Natoli
    3. Eric J Camm
    3 lawyer answers

    It's possible that your current employer would void the non-compete if they understood the situation. That being said, it would probably be a good idea to have a lawyer look over your non-compete to fully educate you on the law in Ohio as well as to evaluate the enforceability of your current agreement and advise on what your best strategy is moving forward.

    3 lawyers agreed with this answer

  9. Can a corporate veil be pierced for only 1 of 2 partners in an LLC?

    Answered about 1 year ago.

    1. Clay A Alger
    2. Eric J Camm
    3. Celia R Reed
    4. John P Corrigan
    4 lawyer answers

    Not necessarily. Piercing the corporate veil is difficult and generally depends a lot on the specific facts of the situation. If you are concerned I would consult a local attorney who can advise you as to your own personal interests (as opposed to provide counsel regarding your entity).

    3 lawyers agreed with this answer

  10. Why are vending machines and parking meters allowed to not accept pennies while pennies are legal tender?

    Answered about 1 year ago.

    1. Jayson Lutzky
    2. Eric J Camm
    3. Michael Hal Schwartz
    3 lawyer answers

    Different businesses. You use vending machines and parking meters subject to their terms and conditions generally. If they want to restrict the kind of payments they accept - so be it. Lots of companies put parameters around how they accept payments. My guess would be that tow truck services and other services where you have been fined are not allowed to refuse legal tender to pay off the balance of what you owe to recover your property.

    3 lawyers agreed with this answer