Skip to main content
Jennifer L Treadwell Karol

Jennifer Karol’s Answers

5 total

  • My rental tenants are haven't paid rent, and now 10 days late. I want to serve a 3 day pay or vacate notice.

    Ideally, I'd like to evict them. This is the 2nd time. The condo is in foreclosure, but I'm doing a short sell. Do I file the 3 day pay or vacate notice with the city of Renton, or King County Courthouse? I want to ensure it's legal, and after the...

    Jennifer’s Answer

    In addition to the other advice provided, you'll want to make sure to comply with the notice provisions of RCW 59.12.040 in serving your notice to pay or vacate. The notice should not be filed with the court unless or until you choose to proceed with an unlawful detainer action.

    See question 
  • What to do with a problem tentent

    I am doing an eviction and a tenent may advoid me. What can I do if I can't hand him this notice. Also, his rent is pass due 5 days. With a written and signed agreement I gave him 15 days, but the state of Washinton say 10 days. Which one can I go...

    Jennifer’s Answer

    Proper service of a notice to pay or vacate may be a) personally delivered to the tenant, b) personally delivered to a person of suitable age and discretion at the subject premises and also mailed to the tenant, or c) by affixing a copy of the notice to a conspicuous place on the premises (the front door) and also mailing a copy. The first two options are recommended, and the third should only be used as a last resort.

    The notice requirements in RCW 59.12 control unless the parties have agreed to other notice requirements. To be safe, you should give the 15 days notice you and your tenant agreed to.

    See question 
  • Can a tenant break lease and move out if tenancy is less than 30 days?

    My son has been in his apartment in downtown Seattle for less than a month, and he's miserable because the shared bathroom is being used by someone as a smoking room. Can he legally break the lease without penalty?

    Jennifer’s Answer

    • Selected as best answer

    If the lease has a specified term (6 months or 1 year) and is not a month to month tenancy, the fact that your son has only resided in the property for thirty days will not be cause to break the lease. However, the lawndlord does have a duty under RCW 59.18.060(3) to keep any shared common areas reasaonbly clean, sanitary, and safe from defects increasing the hazards of fire or accident. Furthermore, the landlord has a duty under RCW 59.18.060(11)(a)(iv) to disclose whether the apartment building has a smoking policy and what that policy is. If that policy was not disclosed to your son, he can request a copy of the policy and the landlord must give it to him. If smoking is not allowed in the shared bathroom per the policy, and/or if the smoking is unreasaonble, the landlord will have a duty to address the problem. Your son should send written notice of his complaint to the landlord, and if the landlord fails to address the issue your son may have cause to terminate the lease.

    If there is not a smoking policy, the smoking is not unreasonable, or if smoking is allowed your son may have little recourse.

    It is important to read the terms of the lease carefully as well as the terms of any policies on smoking. What is unreasonable to your son, may be considered reasonable to an ordinary person.

    See question 
  • Looking for evicted tenants

    If you have the contacts for both of your tenents parents and their addresses is it ok to contact them to let them know you are looking for them? See if they will give you any information on whereabouts, ect? I have a $3000 Superior Court judgemen...

    Jennifer’s Answer

    Yes, although you should be forthright about the reason for your call. (i.e. attempt to locate the tenants to collect on your judgment)

    See question 
  • I was awarded over $3000 thru the Superior Court against my evicted tenants. What is the best way to collect this judgement?

    I dont know there current whereabouts but I do have their SSN, DOB, Drivers License #'s, previous addresses and some other bank account information (dont know how current or if still open though). I've paid an attorney for the Writ and eviction an...

    Jennifer’s Answer

    Since you have bank account information for your former tenants, one of the best ways to collect on the judgment is through a garnishment proceeding. The controlling statute is RCW 6.27. In a garnishment proceeding you can collect the amount of the judgment plus interest to the date of the garnishment and your attorney fees and costs for pursuing the garnishment. The garnishment proceedure is a bit technical, and it is important to follow the statute carefully in pursuing it.

    See question