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Andrea R. Rogers

Andrea Rogers’s Answers

981 total


  • What's the best course of action for me to take on my 27 mph over the speed limit violation in a rural area near Jackson, Mo?

    I'm 17 years old and have had one prior ticket. I also need to change the court date, as I will not be in town that day. If at all possible, no jail time and just fines would work the best. I have heard about driving school and wandered if that wo...

    Andrea’s Answer

    The outcome of your case and the amount of the fine & court costs depends on 1) which court your case is being prosecuted in, 2) how fast you were driving, and 3) how bad your driving record is.

    Driving 27 miles over the speed limit is very serious. In some courts, the judge won't amend such a high-speed ticket to a non-moving, no-point violation at all. Or the best offer your attorney may be able to negotiate for you may be probation with a suspended imposition of sentence (SIS).

    With an SIS, you will have to appear in court with your attorney and plead guilty, then you will be put on probation. You will also probably have to complete driving school and possibly also perform a few hours of community service. If you successfully complete probation without getting any more speeding tickets, the court will close the case and there will be no conviction on your record.

    You need to hire an experienced traffic law attorney to represent you. Your attorney can tell you what outcome to expect and can get a continuance of the court date if you are required to appear in court and the court date is inconvenient for you.

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  • Is there a way to get points back on your licesense by going to a judge?

    This question is for my boyfriend he was sapose to go to driving classes back in February to get points back on his liscense he had never attended and thought his liscense suspended for 30 days had just found out his liscense had been revolked fo...

    Andrea’s Answer

    He can hire a traffic law attorney to withdraw his guilty plea and get the ticket reduced to a non-moving, no-point violation. He may have to do that for several tickets to reduce the point total enough to lift the suspension.

    Some judges won't approve a withdrawal of a guilty plea after 3-6 months have passed, while other judges will approve it even up to a year or more after the conviction date. It just depends on how much time has passed since the conviction date (the date on which he paid the fine), and how bad his driving record is.

    Also, sometimes the judge will allow the defendant to withdraw his guilty plea but the prosecutor won't agree to reduce the ticket. In some courts, the attorney and defendant have to appear in court for a hearing on the motion to withdraw the guilty plea.

    It's all do-able, but it is a bit time-consuming for the attorney, so this will be more expensive than just getting a speeding ticket fixed.

    You need to find an experienced traffic law attorney who has done this before and can give you an estimate of how much it will cost. It may be cheaper for your boyfriend to just get a hardship license.

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  • If you plea to a lesser charge, are you not guilty of the original? If so, where is that stated at?

    If you plea to a lesser charge, are you not guilty of the original? If so, where is that stated at?

    Andrea’s Answer

    If your attorney works out a deal with the Prosecutor so you can plead guilty to a lesser offense, the court records will show that you pleaded guilty to the lesser offense. For example: if you were charged with marijuana possession but the plea bargain deal that your attorney negotiates allows you to plead guilty to "Littering" instead. If you were not arrested, then the only thing that will show up on your criminal background report is a conviction for "Littering," meaning you pleaded guilty to the amended charge of "Littering."

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  • What does it mean when I type in my case number on case net and it says there is no file by that case number?

    On probation and went to look up my case on case net and can't find it anywhere. At one point I could view it now it's no longer there

    Andrea’s Answer

    I agree with attorney Hardin -- while you are on probation for an SIS for a case in state circuit court, your case is open & pending, meaning it's visible to the general public on casenet. (With a few rare exceptions, most municipal court cases are not on casenet.) Once your probation period is successfully completed, the court closes your case and there is no conviction, and it's no longer visible on casenet.

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  • Do i need to get a lawyer for this traffic ticket?

    Im from Missouri, i was driving through Illinois to go to Wisconsin for college visit. I was pulled over for speeding, 15mph over. I was given a ticket for speeding. The officer told me i did not need to show up for court - because i live far from...

    Andrea’s Answer

    Never take legal advice from a police officer.

    If you just pay the $120 fine as the cop suggested, Illinois will report the speeding conviction to Missouri and Missouri will add points to your driving record. One option is to call the court clerk in IL where you got the ticket and ask if you can be put on court supervision. Some Illinois counties allow that, and if you successfully complete the supervision period with no other tickets, the court will close the case and there will be no conviction at all. If the county in IL where you received the ticket does not allow that option, then your only choice is to hire a traffic law attorney who practices in that county to represent you if you want to avoid accumulating points on your Missouri driving record.

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  • What is the practical difference between getting a speeding ticket amended to infraction speeding vs. defective equipment?

    Prosecutor is offering defective equipment, or infraction speeding for $50 less. I assume that means there'd be some advantage to the defective equipment, but I'm not sure what that is.

    Andrea’s Answer

    Both are non-moving, no-point violations in Missouri that won't affect your driving record or insurance rates. Perhaps the "Defective Equipment" amendment would matter if you are a truck driver with a commercial driver's license from a state in which "Defective Equipment" is considered a point violation. If you are concerned, ask your attorney, or call the Prosecuting Attorney's office and ask for clarification.

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  • I stole 2 bottles of alcohol and i have court tomorrow. Im 17.. Any advice before i go

    3 months ago i stole 2 bottles of alcohol worth about 12$ each. I am going to plead guilty and explain why i did it but is there anything i need to look forward to? Im 17

    Andrea’s Answer

    If you plead guilty, you will have this conviction on your permanent criminal record and it will prevent you from getting a job, renting an apartment, getting federal student loans for college, etc. Ask the judge for a continuance to allow you time to hire a lawyer. The judge will give you a continuance, no questions asked. Then hire an attorney. Your attorney will probably be able to get the stealing charge reduced to a lesser offense, such as "Littering." If you are afraid to tell your parents and ask them for help in paying for a lawyer, just think -- they would probably prefer to help you pay for a lawyer than have you be unable to get a job, rent an apartment, or get loans for college.

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  • Needing help getting drug conviction expunged from my record.

    Conviction 1974 Lafayette County, MO

    Andrea’s Answer

    Current Missouri law does not allow a drug conviction to be expunged from your criminal record.

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  • Friend has a warrant on a possession charge for failure to appear. This is in Missouri

    34 year old female. charge and failure both in 2014 and in St Louis Missouri.

    Andrea’s Answer

    A criminal defense attorney can get the warrant lifted and the marijuana charge dismissed or reduced to a lesser offense, depending on your criminal history and which court your case is in.

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