Skip to main content
C. Curran Coulter
Avvo
Pro

C. Coulter’s Answers

94 total


  • Can we move states with a felony

    my husband has been on probation for about 2.5 years for a drug felony we want to move to colorado to live with my dad. can we even though his family is not there just mine. he hasnt been in any trouble except 1 dirty UA. which was over a year ago.

    C.’s Answer

    His ability to move would be at the discretion of his probation officer and the Court. Contact the probation officer to ask about this move and explain your situation.

    *** If you like my answer, please mark it as the best answer.

    Sincerely,
    C. Curran Coulter II, J.D.
    Attorney and Counselor at Law
    THE COULTER LAW FIRM, LLC
    8000 Maryland Ave., Suite 1060
    St. Louis, Missouri 63105
    www.stl-lawfirm.com
    Office: (314) 721-1116
    Fax: (314) 725-1026
    curran@stl-lawfirm.com

    Legal disclaimer: The response given is not intended to create, nor does it create an ongoing duty to respond to questions. The response does not form an attorney-client relationship, nor is it intended to be anything other than the educated opinion of the author. It should not be relied upon as legal advice. The response given is based upon the limited facts provided by the person asking the question. To the extent additional or different facts exist, the response might possibly change. Attorney is licensed to practice law only in the State of Missouri and the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Missouri. Responses are based solely on Missouri law unless stated otherwise.

    See question 
  • Got arrested for a 1st Time offense DUI. How much is this going to cost me if I go through a high end lawyer like Travis Noble?

    1st Time DUI (1st time anything....even a speeding ticket), Failure to yield to emergency vehicle, careless driving, .12 BAC, Active Duty Marine

    C.’s Answer

    Lawyers billable rates vary.

    I would contact a few attorneys and see which one you trust and get along with best. Treat it like a job interview. They are trying to win you business based on their rates, experience, knowledge, dedication to your case, and whatever other factors you think are important. You have complete discretion as to how many attorneys you meet with before deciding whom to hire. Many offer free consultations to entice clients to meet with them.

    On a personal note, I work in the same building as Mr. Noble. He has a good reputation in the community.

    *** If you like my answer, please mark it as the best answer.

    Sincerely,
    C. Curran Coulter II, J.D.
    Attorney and Counselor at Law
    THE COULTER LAW FIRM, LLC
    8000 Maryland Ave., Suite 1060
    St. Louis, Missouri 63105
    www.stl-lawfirm.com
    Office: (314) 721-1116
    Fax: (314) 725-1026
    curran@stl-lawfirm.com

    Legal disclaimer: The response given is not intended to create, nor does it create an ongoing duty to respond to questions. The response does not form an attorney-client relationship, nor is it intended to be anything other than the educated opinion of the author. It should not be relied upon as legal advice. The response given is based upon the limited facts provided by the person asking the question. To the extent additional or different facts exist, the response might possibly change. Attorney is licensed to practice law only in the State of Missouri and the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Missouri. Responses are based solely on Missouri law unless stated otherwise.

    See question 
  • If I make 100,000 a year while my spouse makes 30,000 a year will I have to pay him alimony?

    y? I am willing to give him one of the cars(now worth 10,000) in good working order, the house (we still owe 99,000 on it. Payments are around 1,000/mo) and pay for our daughter's student loan entirely (650/month)?? Also, he does have 24,000 from ...

    C.’s Answer

    Alimony, called spousal support, can only be granted by Court Order. Such a Court Order is a result of either the Judge deciding to award it based on the evidence produced at trial or the parties agreement.

    Courts look toward the factors mentioned in RSMo 452.335 to determine whether and how much support should be awarded. Here is a link to that statute: (http://www.moga.mo.gov/statutes/C400-499/4520000335.HTM).

    I would talk to your attorney, they will be able to discuss how your particular situation would likely play out and help you put together a settlement offer with terms that you find acceptable. If you do not have an attorney, I strongly suggest you find an attorney with family law experience to guide you through your divorce.

    *** If you like my answer, please mark it as the best answer.

    Sincerely,
    C. Curran Coulter II, J.D.
    Attorney and Counselor at Law
    THE COULTER LAW FIRM, LLC
    8000 Maryland Ave., Suite 1060
    St. Louis, Missouri 63105
    www.stl-lawfirm.com
    Office: (314) 721-1116
    Fax: (314) 725-1026
    curran@stl-lawfirm.com

    Legal disclaimer: The response given is not intended to create, nor does it create an ongoing duty to respond to questions. The response does not form an attorney-client relationship, nor is it intended to be anything other than the educated opinion of the author. It should not be relied upon as legal advice. The response given is based upon the limited facts provided by the person asking the question. To the extent additional or different facts exist, the response might possibly change. Attorney is licensed to practice law only in the State of Missouri and the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Missouri. Responses are based solely on Missouri law unless stated otherwise.

    See question 
  • * Need of Second Opinion... "Can I keep receiving unemployment and possibly file for (Missouri) Social Security Disability?"

    Injured 2012, lost (termination) job, out of work-injury for 9 months, ( job held 6 months), was released by employer's surgeon, fighting WC case, (never received WC benefits), occupational disease (other injuries also) My doctor confirmed; "unabl...

    C.’s Answer

    There is not enough information provided in this question to fully answer your question.

    The Social Security Administration put out a pamphlet on disbility benefits that may be able to answer your question more fully - http://www.ssa.gov/pubs/10029.pdf

    If you need additional information, contact either SSA or an attorney with experience in that field.

    Good luck!

    *** If you like my answer, please mark it as the best answer.

    Sincerely,
    C. Curran Coulter II, J.D.
    Attorney and Counselor at Law
    THE COULTER LAW FIRM, LLC
    8000 Maryland Ave., Suite 1060
    St. Louis, Missouri 63105
    www.stl-lawfirm.com
    Office: (314) 721-1116
    Fax: (314) 725-1026
    curran@stl-lawfirm.com

    Legal disclaimer: The response given is not intended to create, nor does it create an ongoing duty to respond to questions. The response does not form an attorney-client relationship, nor is it intended to be anything other than the educated opinion of the author. It should not be relied upon as legal advice. The response given is based upon the limited facts provided by the person asking the question. To the extent additional or different facts exist, the response might possibly change. Attorney is licensed to practice law only in the State of Missouri and the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Missouri. Responses are based solely on Missouri law unless stated otherwise.

    See question 
  • I was just turned down for a job because I am a DUI felon. The job was in a call center, working on the phone. Is this legal?

    I have 4 DUIs the felony was added in Oct of 2011.

    C.’s Answer

    It is legal to choose not to hire someone based on their prior DUI or felony charges. It is not like a protected class that receives additional protection against discrimination.

    It is surprising that they would tell you that a DUI is the only reason you did not get the job.

    Many articles have been written about the increased difficulty those with DUI's face in their job hunt, i.e. (http://ebranding.me/archive/the-impact-a-dui-charge-can-have-on-your-job-search/).

    Good luck finding a job.

    *** If you like my answer, please mark it as the best answer.

    Sincerely,
    C. Curran Coulter II, J.D.
    Attorney and Counselor at Law
    THE COULTER LAW FIRM, LLC
    8000 Maryland Ave., Suite 1060
    St. Louis, Missouri 63105
    www.stl-lawfirm.com
    Office: (314) 721-1116
    Fax: (314) 725-1026
    curran@stl-lawfirm.com

    Legal disclaimer: The response given is not intended to create, nor does it create an ongoing duty to respond to questions. The response does not form an attorney-client relationship, nor is it intended to be anything other than the educated opinion of the author. It should not be relied upon as legal advice. The response given is based upon the limited facts provided by the person asking the question. To the extent additional or different facts exist, the response might possibly change. Attorney is licensed to practice law only in the State of Missouri and the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Missouri. Responses are based solely on Missouri law unless stated otherwise.

    See question 
  • Can you file a restraning order on your father and your father still have to pay child support?

    My boyfriend has court on friday, to see about child support since he is now 18 but still attending school. His parents have been divorced for most of his life, and he has not had contact with him for most of his life. His father was abusive to hi...

    C.’s Answer

    He can get a restraining order (called "an order of protection") against his father if he meets the standards for filing one. More information on that is available on this website: http://www.courts.mo.gov/page.jsp?id=533

    Child support obligations continue until:
    a) The child reaches a certain age:
    - 18 or high school diploma (whichever happens later)
    - If the child is enrolled in "an institution of vocational or higher education", up to 21 or until complete his/her education (which ever comes first) - NOTE: must also meets certain additional requirements related to number of credit hours and work during enrollment and notice to the payor.
    - If the child has special needs and the Court may order for support to continue past the requirements above;
    c) the court grants a modification of the Order for child support; or
    d) a parties death.

    Hope this helps!

    *** If you like my answer, please mark it as the best answer.

    Sincerely,
    C. Curran Coulter II, J.D.
    Attorney and Counselor at Law
    THE COULTER LAW FIRM, LLC
    8000 Maryland Ave., Suite 1060
    St. Louis, Missouri 63105
    www.stl-lawfirm.com
    Office: (314) 721-1116
    Fax: (314) 725-1026
    curran@stl-lawfirm.com

    Legal disclaimer: The response given is not intended to create, nor does it create an ongoing duty to respond to questions. The response does not form an attorney-client relationship, nor is it intended to be anything other than the educated opinion of the author. It should not be relied upon as legal advice. The response given is based upon the limited facts provided by the person asking the question. To the extent additional or different facts exist, the response might possibly change. Attorney is licensed to practice law only in the State of Missouri and the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Missouri. Responses are based solely on Missouri law unless stated otherwise.

    See question 
  • I live on a month to month lease at my apartments. I was informed today that to leave i have to give a 60 days notice

    Which i am fine with. I went up to give my notice today and i was told that my 60 day notice to leave my apartments wouldn't 'go into effect' until 26 more days have passed (May 1st) THEN my 60 days start from that date...so i am being asked to gi...

    C.’s Answer

    The answer to this question would depend on the terms of your lease. I suggest consulting an attorney in the area that has experience in this area of law. They will be able to review your lease to ensure your rights are properly advocated.

    Also, depending on what "horrible things" have happened in the apartment, you may be able to break the lease early. The attorney you consult will be able to tell whether that is applicable in this situation - i.e. Constructive Eviction.

    *** If you like my answer, please mark it as the best answer.
    Sincerely,
    C. Curran Coulter II, J.D.
    Attorney and Counselor at Law
    THE COULTER LAW FIRM, LLC
    8000 Maryland Ave., Suite 1060
    St. Louis, Missouri 63105
    www.stl-lawfirm.com
    Office: (314) 721-1116
    Fax: (314) 725-1026
    curran@stl-lawfirm.com

    Legal disclaimer: The response given is not intended to create, nor does it create an ongoing duty to respond to questions. The response does not form an attorney-client relationship, nor is it intended to be anything other than the educated opinion of the author. It should not be relied upon as legal advice. The response given is based upon the limited facts provided by the person asking the question. To the extent additional or different facts exist, the response might possibly change. Attorney is licensed to practice law only in the State of Missouri and the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Missouri. Responses are based solely on Missouri law unless stated otherwise.

    See question 
  • Can a probation officer tell their friends about my case

    I am on probation and I work with a friend of my probation officer and any time I have any trouble it seems like their friend knows as soon as it happens and questions me about my situation. This friend of their is not in law enforcement in any wa...

    C.’s Answer

    • Selected as best answer

    No, it is not legal.

    Probation officers have a statutory duty to keep certain information confidential. This duty is outlined in RSMo 559.125.2

    "2. Information and data obtained by a probation or parole officer shall be privileged information and shall not be receivable in any court. Such information shall not be disclosed directly or indirectly to anyone other than the members of a parole board and the judge entitled to receive reports, except the court or the board may in its discretion permit the inspection of the report, or parts of such report, by the defendant, or offender or his attorney, or other person having a proper interest therein."

    There was a recent case in the Missouri Western District Court of Appeals in which a probation officer was sued for certain disclosures: http://www1.law.umkc.edu/library/mo_opinions_wd/02152011/Opinion_WD70674.pdf

    I would consider contacting your probation officer and his supervisor about these disclosures.

    *** If you like my answer, please mark it as the best answer.
    Sincerely,
    C. Curran Coulter II, J.D.
    Attorney and Counselor at Law
    THE COULTER LAW FIRM, LLC
    8000 Maryland Ave., Suite 1060
    St. Louis, Missouri 63105
    www.stl-lawfirm.com
    Office: (314) 721-1116
    Fax: (314) 725-1026
    curran@stl-lawfirm.com

    Legal disclaimer: The response given is not intended to create, nor does it create an ongoing duty to respond to questions. The response does not form an attorney-client relationship, nor is it intended to be anything other than the educated opinion of the author. It should not be relied upon as legal advice. The response given is based upon the limited facts provided by the person asking the question. To the extent additional or different facts exist, the response might possibly change. Attorney is licensed to practice law only in the State of Missouri and the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Missouri. Responses are based solely on Missouri law unless stated otherwise.

    See question 
  • I blew into someone's interlock device that has a camera and it caused him to get a fail on his interlock report.

    I went out for girls night and got a ride home. I needed to take the dogs to get groomed the next day and used his car while he was at work. The interlock failed. He is on probation and has already been in trouble for failing it himself. The inter...

    C.’s Answer

    • Selected as best answer

    How much, if any, trouble he gets in will be subject to the terms of the court order to use the device and the discretion of the judge. You can try to argue that he was not using the car at the time and the camera will bolster that argument.

    Worth noting, LifeSaver, one of the companies that produces these devices addresses this subject in their FAQ section: "Can other people operate my vehicle? Yes, but anyone driving the vehicle will need to use the interlock and you will be responsible for any violations." - http://www.lifesafer.com/frequently-asked-questions/#q12

    Hope this helps!

    *** If you like my answer, please mark it as the best answer.
    Sincerely,
    C. Curran Coulter II, J.D.
    Attorney and Counselor at Law
    THE COULTER LAW FIRM, LLC
    8000 Maryland Ave., Suite 1060
    St. Louis, Missouri 63105
    www.stl-lawfirm.com
    Office: (314) 721-1116
    Fax: (314) 725-1026
    curran@stl-lawfirm.com

    Legal disclaimer: The response given is not intended to create, nor does it create an ongoing duty to respond to questions. The response does not form an attorney-client relationship, nor is it intended to be anything other than the educated opinion of the author. It should not be relied upon as legal advice. The response given is based upon the limited facts provided by the person asking the question. To the extent additional or different facts exist, the response might possibly change. Attorney is licensed to practice law only in the State of Missouri and the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Missouri. Responses are based solely on Missouri law unless stated otherwise.

    See question 
  • Is it true that they can't extend your probation longer than the original sentence?

    I have a friend serving time in DOC for a probation violation. He has been on probation for over 6 years. Original sentence was a suspended sentence and was given 5 years of probation. The guys in the legal library said that they according to s...

    C.’s Answer

    No, this is not true. I.E. There are many people who are not sentenced to jail time (original sentence = 0 years) but are sentenced to have probation (probation time = X years).

    Good luck!

    *** If you like my answer, please mark it as the best answer.

    Sincerely,
    C. Curran Coulter II, J.D.
    Attorney and Counselor at Law
    THE COULTER LAW FIRM, LLC
    8000 Maryland Ave., Suite 1060
    St. Louis, Missouri 63105
    www.stl-lawfirm.com
    Office: (314) 721-1116
    Fax: (314) 725-1026
    curran@stl-lawfirm.com

    Legal disclaimer: The response given is not intended to create, nor does it create an ongoing duty to respond to questions. The response does not form an attorney-client relationship, nor is it intended to be anything other than the educated opinion of the author. It should not be relied upon as legal advice. The response given is based upon the limited facts provided by the person asking the question. To the extent additional or different facts exist, the response might possibly change. Attorney is licensed to practice law only in the State of Missouri and the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Missouri. Responses are based solely on Missouri law unless stated otherwise.

    See question