Jennifer Lynn Bennett’s Answers

Jennifer Lynn Bennett

Chicago Immigration Attorney.

Contributor Level 10
  1. Does President Obama's new policy regarding Illegal Immigrants override previous laws ensued on illegals married to US citizens?

    Answered about 2 years ago.

    1. Jennifer Lynn Bennett
    2. Giacomo Jacques Behar
    3. Ksenia Alexandrovna Maiorova
    4. Michael Gregory Snytkin
    5. Young Ah Ri
    6. ···
    6 lawyer answers

    No, the new policy does not override the 3 or 10 year bars. Furthermore, it is not a "2 year amnesty" and it is not a law. It is merely a policy that allows a person who meets specific criteria (such as entering the US before age 16, having resided in the US for the past 5 years, who either has graduated from school or is enrolled in school, etc.) to apply for "deferred action" which will prevent them from being subjected to deportation for a period of 2 years. Also, it will allow them to...

    7 lawyers agreed with this answer

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  2. Do I need a tax attorney for a $61,000 tax bill from the IRS?

    Answered almost 2 years ago.

    1. John P Fazzio III
    2. Michael S Anderson
    3. Richard Albert Luthmann
    4. Pamela Koslyn
    5. Jennifer Lynn Bennett
    6. ···
    7 lawyer answers

    Wow...that is definitely a large tax bill! I recommend hiring a tax attorney as soon as possible to help you figure out the best plan of attack. f you don't contest it, you will certainly owe it to the government still and it will never go away. An attorney can help you to figure out if you truly owe that amount of money, help you contest it if it's incorrect, and help you to figure out the best method for resolving this matter whether it involves payment or not. Good luck!

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  3. I'm a US Citizen and my husband is in the US as an illegal immigrant.

    Answered about 2 years ago.

    1. Giacomo Jacques Behar
    2. Jennifer Lynn Bennett
    3. Tsirina Goroshit
    4. F. J. Capriotti III
    5. Dhenu Mitesh Savla
    5 lawyer answers

    Your case is an extremely complex one. I strongly encourage you to contact an experienced immigration attorney. With additional information, an experienced immigration attorney can help you to figure out the best plan for your situation. It certainly would not hurt to contact a pro bono attorney or legal aid agency to see if they can assist you--however, do not be surprised if they are not able to assist you since your case is a difficult one. Also, you may need to work with both an immigration...

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  4. F2A being current & filed I-485

    Answered about 1 year ago.

    1. Giacomo Jacques Behar
    2. Jennifer Lynn Bennett
    3. F. J. Capriotti III
    4. Alexander M. Ivakhnenko
    5. Stephen D. Berman
    6. ···
    6 lawyer answers

    Your question is a very complex one and each case is unique. I highly encourage you to consult with an experienced immigration attorney who can inquire about more particular details of your particular situation and give you the best advice for you personally. The best decision may differ from person to person based on number of other factors. That being said, I always encourage my clients to continue to maintain status--there are potential consequences that could result for failure to do so,...

    4 lawyers agreed with this answer

  5. Do I need a professional translator to translate my birth certificate or anyone who is fluent in English and my language can ?

    Answered over 1 year ago.

    1. Alena Shautsova
    2. Alexander Joseph Segal
    3. Sasha O. Lazarevich-Sinnott
    4. C. C. Abbott
    5. Dean P Murray
    6. ···
    7 lawyer answers

    You do not need to have a professional translate it for you, and it does not need to be notarized. It just needs to contain a "certification" at the end of the document that states that the individual who translated it is proficient in both the English language and the language the birth certificate is in. You can find a sample certification statement to see what it looks like on the USCIS website. Good luck!

    4 lawyers agreed with this answer

  6. When can I apply for citizenship after after my 10 year green card issued Jun 2012 & my husband/petitioner is divorcing me?

    Answered almost 2 years ago.

    1. Carl Michael Shusterman
    2. Giacomo Jacques Behar
    3. Alena Shautsova
    4. Jennifer Lynn Bennett
    5. Myron Russell Morales
    6. ···
    8 lawyer answers

    You can apply for citizenship after 3 years if based on marriage, and after 5 years otherwise. Also, as my colleagues have stated you may actually submit the application for citizenship 3 months prior to when you would be eligible. Sounds like you already removed the conditions on your 2 year conditional green card and obtained your 10 year permanent green card--if that's the case, there's nothing further that you need to do right now before applying for citizenship. Your daughter's will have...

    4 lawyers agreed with this answer

  7. I am waiting from 5 months after my husbands interview in march they ask more proof of sponsorship which we provided in 24 hrs

    Answered about 2 years ago.

    1. Alexander M. Ivakhnenko
    2. Stephen D. Berman
    3. Jennifer Lynn Bennett
    4. Giacomo Jacques Behar
    4 lawyer answers

    Although you say that you do not have any money to get a lawyer to help you, I encourage you to really consider how important it is to you to get your husband here to the US. With all due respect, you may need to rearrange your priorities and truly try to come up with some funds to get an experienced attorney to assist you. Without more facts, it is hard to say for certain, but it sounds like there are either some complications with your husband's case (hence, it is taking the government a long-...

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  8. Can a lawyer not licensed or passed the bar in your state to practice law in your state contact you via phone

    Answered almost 2 years ago.

    1. Robert A. Stumpf
    2. Luca Cristiano Maria Melchionna
    3. Jennifer Lynn Bennett
    4. David M. Slater
    5. Martha Ann Knutson
    5 lawyer answers

    An unlicensed lawyer may not engage in the practice of law. However, it doesn't sound like that was the case here--sounds like this individual was just contacting you on behalf of the company--its your choice whether to answer or speak with the person, or with anyone from the company for that matter. Also, doesn't sound like it was harassment as it didn't occur repetitively and doesn't seem unreasonable in any way. Sounds like this person was trying to be reasonable and work out the best...

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  9. Hi! I am a derivative beneficiary of the US immigrant petition filed by the spouse of my biological father( lead beneficiary).

    Answered almost 2 years ago.

    1. Alena Shautsova
    2. Giacomo Jacques Behar
    3. Jennifer Lynn Bennett
    4. Jeffrey N Lisnow
    5. Elliot M.S. Yi
    5 lawyer answers

    As my colleagues have explained, your step-mother could only include you on the petition when she petitioned for your father if you were under age 18 at the time of their marriage. If you were over age 18 at the time of their marriage, your step-mother could not petition for you. In that case, your father, whose petition is now approved, should petition for you at this time. Good luck.

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  10. Is there a waiver you can file for if you came to the country illegal ?

    Answered over 1 year ago.

    1. Daniel Warren Thomann
    2. Samuel Patrick Ouya Maina
    3. Dhenu Mitesh Savla
    4. Jennifer Lynn Bennett
    5. Alexander Joseph Segal
    6. ···
    8 lawyer answers

    Just as my colleagues have pointed out, you would be barred from admission into the US for 10 years--however, the waiver you would apply for to overcome this problem is a request for the US government to waive the 10 year bar against you. You note that your US citizen child and fiance would suffer if you were forced to remain aboard. However, please keep in mind that you must prove that a qualifying relative, as defined by the new waiver law, would suffer extreme hardship if you were deported...

    3 lawyers agreed with this answer