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Gregory Richard Mansell

Gregory Mansell’s Answers

57 total


  • I was recently fired from my job due to the fact that i had to have surgery. I want to know if i was wrongfully terminated

    I had to have my gallbladder removed and no longer had any FMLA time left. They told me that due to their attendance policy they had to let me go. I was granted an extended leave when I had my baby early this year and they said because they alrea...

    Gregory’s Answer

    You may have a disability discrimination, gender discrimination, or race discrimination case. I would need to know more facts about what your company has done with other employees. Please give me a call if you would like to discuss.

    Greg Mansell
    (614) 610-4134
    www.Ohio-EmploymentLawyer.com

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  • My wife's company docked her pay, and it puts her below Ohio minimum wage. Is this legal?

    Hello, my wife is employed at a local daycare; where she is an hourly employee and is paid $8.00/hr. In her time there, she has missed a total of four days (all excused). However, according to company rules, "all personnel who miss a certain amo...

    Gregory’s Answer

    Your wife's employer is simply not permitted to pay your wife less than minimum wage for hours worked. Although the amount at issue may be minimal, your wife should submit a complaint in writing seeking to have her pay corrected. If the employer retaliates or refuses, I suggest you speak with an attorney.

    Greg Mansell
    (614) 610-4134
    www.ohio-employmentlawyer.com

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  • I work in a physicians office, the office manager is now using my health condition for mistakes i make, but yet other employees

    slide on by. I need to work but not like this. If I quit can I collect unemployment? I have documented situations because I've seen what they did to three previous employeees

    Gregory’s Answer

    Before an employee resigns from their employment, they should consult an attorney. Have you requested an accommodation related to your medical condition? I am interested as to how your medical condition impacts your ability to perform your job; whether an accommodation would be helpful; and what the different treat is like between you and the other employees without a medical condition.

    If you would like to discuss further, please contact me.

    Greg Mansell
    (614) 610-4134
    Greg.Mansell@Ohio-EmploymentLawyer.com

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  • Other

    department and they are currently abolishing my contractual full time position along with three other full time employeers. Our contract with said police department is still good for another two years. Further, our contract states that our employm...

    Gregory’s Answer

    You should consult an attorney to review your contract and the reason provided to you by the department. If you would like to talk more you can email or call me.

    Greg Mansell
    (614)610-4134
    Greg.Mansell@Ohio-EmploymentLawyer.com

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  • Unemployment denied me for benefits because my ex-employer states i quit can i qualify?

    I was being asked by my company to preform duties that were outside my job description and without proper training. I talked to my boss and express to him that i would not be doing what i was asked, since i was already doing dual jobs for the comp...

    Gregory’s Answer

    An applicant’s unemployment must not be his/her fault. If the applicant quits a job while the option of remaining employed exists, he/she causes the unemployment. To establish eligibility, the applicant must show that he/she had “just cause” for leaving the job. To view examples of what may constitute just cause, visit my website below.

    If you have any questions, feel free to call me.

    Greg Mansell
    (614)610-4134

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  • ? Does my employer have to pay me for this? how does it work?

    I work with a non profit organization, we serve people with dd its health care. they have positions which are called in live positions it would be like 230p to 1030p then they say to clock off and want us to stay there sleeping off the clock. and ...

    Gregory’s Answer

    Under Federal Law, you should be compensated in the following way:

    On-Call Time: An employee who is required to remain on call on the employer's premises is working while "on call." An employee who is required to remain on call at home, or who is allowed to leave a message where he/she can be reached, is not working (in most cases) while on call. Additional constraints on the employee's freedom could require this time to be compensated

    Sleeping Time and Certain Other Activities: An employee who is required to be on duty for less than 24 hours is working even though he/she is permitted to sleep or engage in other personal activities when not busy. An employee required to be on duty for 24 hours or more may agree with the employer to exclude from hours worked bona fide regularly scheduled sleeping periods of not more than 8 hours, provided adequate sleeping facilities are furnished by the employer and the employee can usually enjoy an uninterrupted night's sleep. No reduction is permitted unless at least 5 hours of sleep is taken.

    Please call me if you would like to discuss the details of your case further.

    Greg Mansell
    (614) 610-4134

    See question 
  • This sounds like I got fired for being pregnant doesn't it?!

    I worked at a bar for around 6-7 months. September 22nd I told the bar I was pregnant ( I wasn't showing nor close to showing) On Monday September 24th one of the owners of the bar said he did not want a pregnant bartender that it did not look a...

    Gregory’s Answer

    I would suggest contacting an employment lawyer to discuss the details of your case. This sound like Direct Evidence of Pregnancy Discrimination.

    Greg Mansell

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  • Can my employer fire me for going to doctors appointments?

    I recently started a new job and was sure to let them know that I have a medically necessary appointment once a month with veterans affairs. I was hired on full time, since being hired my medical treatment has gotten more in depth, the VA has prov...

    Gregory’s Answer

    In legal terms, the question you are asking is: does my employer have to provide me this accommodation. The answer is yes but only if it is reasonable and it allows you to perform the essential functions of your job. Whether or not an accommodation is reasonable depends on a number of factors, including what your job duties are, whether you can make up your time at the beginning or end of the shift, and many other. If you would like to provide me more information, I'd be happy to discuss it with you. Check out my website for more information on accommodations.

    Greg Mansell
    (614) 610-4134
    Columbus, Ohio

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  • I was discriminated against but I filed a statement with the civil rights commission in Toledo Oh. It was Emploment Discriminati

    on. Should I have filed with the Equal Employment opportunity commission?

    Gregory’s Answer

    A charge filed with the Ohio Civil Rights Commission is jointly filed with the EEOC unless specifically stated. The general procedure will be the same. In age discrimination cases, filing with the OCRC elects a state remedy. Before filing with an administrative agency on an age claim, contact an employment attorney.

    Greg Mansell
    (614) 610-4134

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  • Can we get paid for our time?

    We r cafeteria workers. They put the transportation supervisor in our department b/c she was horrible there. Well, she's doing it here too. She told us all we have to be certified. It is mandatory. That if we went to columbus it would b paid for, ...

    Gregory’s Answer

    The FLSA requires that an employer compensate an employee for all hours worked. Section 3 of the FLSA defines “employ” as including “to suffer or permit to work.” 29 U.S.C. § 203(g); see also 29 C.F.R. § 785.11. This rule applies to work performed away from the premises or the job site, including work performed at home. “If the employer knows or has reason to believe that the work is being performed, he must count the time as hours worked.” 29 C.F.R. § 785.12.

    Under certain circumstances, time spent by employees of state and local governments attending required training outside of regular working hours is considered to be non-compensable. 29 C.F.R. § 553.226(b). Examples of non-compensable time include time which is required by law for certification of public and private sector employees within a particular governmental jurisdiction (e.g., certification of public and private emergency rescue workers).

    Even if the above situation is not applicable, you still may not be entitled to pay for training. Participation in training programs need not be counted as working time if all of the following criteria are met: Attendance is outside of the employee’s regular working hours; Attendance is in fact voluntary; The course, lecture, or meeting is not directly related to the employee’s job;
    The employee does not perform any productive work during such attendance.
    29 C.F.R. § 785.27.

    Hope this helps answer your question. If you would like to discuss further, please visit my website (below) for contact information.

    Greg Mansell
    Ohio-EmploymentLawyer.com

    See question