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Jesus Novo III

Jesus Novo’s Answers

594 total


  • Why kids still don't received advance parole while their mom received it?

    We submitted biometrics on May, 1 - I received advance parole in 3 weeks - but my kids, 4 and 8 years, still under reviewing process... The case was filed on March, 21. How long to wait for them to receive it and why its separate... Can we travel...

    Jesus’s Answer

    You received it rather quickly; unless you filed it on an emergency basis, the processing time is normal for the kids. If you still have questions, you could request an info pass.

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  • I AM A RETIRED SWEDISH NATIONAL AND WOULD LIKE TO APPLY FOR A B2 VISA AS I WISH TO PURCHASE A VACATION HOME IN FLORIDA.

    WE CAN TRAVEL ON VISA WAIVER PROGRAM BUT I PREFER A B2 VISA BEFORE PURCHASING PROPERTY IN FLORIDA AS I MAY WANT TO STAY LONGER THAN 90 DAYS. I AM 65, OWN 2 HOUSES IN SWEDEN AND HAVE 3 KIDS. A S A CHILD I LIVED IN THE U.S. AS AN ALIEN BETWEEN AGE 5...

    Jesus’s Answer

    I guess you have to make a cost/benefit analysis and then decide if it is worth risking being denied a B2, since as has been previously answered, you will lose your ESTA permit if you are denied a visa. On the other hand, with ESTA you can only stay 90 days in the States and you cannot even get an extension. All these things you should take into consideration to make an informed decision. The fact that you were an LPR at some point could be grounds to believe you intend to immigrate to the States. Good luck.

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  • PLEASE HELP! My LPR BF got detained and sent to Krome detention center. He committed a crime 10 years ago!

    My BF was stopped when returning from a trip abroad due to a felony committed 10 years ago. He had a withhold of adjudication and completed a program for a crime of moral turpitude. After being detained at the airport he was given a scheduled date...

    Jesus’s Answer

    You need to see an experienced immigration attorney immediately. Your boyfriend may be eligible for bond, and he may not, depending on the crime and the violation immigration is charging him with. Time is of the essence and you should be looking to meet an attorney today. What we can tell you here is very limited and you need specific help.

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  • Does my wife needs to live in the US to be a citizen?

    me and my wife are in Nicaragua im a us citizen. we don't want to move to the US can she still be a US citizen, or just residence

    Jesus’s Answer

    If you will not live in the U.S. she won't even be a resident. To become a citizen she will have to become a resident and live in the U.S. for a certain amount of time before she can become a citizen.

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  • I am in removal proceedings because the immigration think that my marriage is a fraud, been married for 6 years.

    my wife left me because things was just not working out, what should I do. I work, don't have any convictions

    Jesus’s Answer

    I agree with my colleagues that you need to consult with a competent Immigration attorney immediately (Board Certified or not; with all due respect, Board Certification does not guarantee competency). You should not take lightly the fact that immigration believes your marriage is a fraud. A finding of fraud could have permanent ramifications for your immigration status. Good luck.

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  • Can I get convicted?

    Arrested for 14 counts of child abuse. I was a tutor in a school, a lady lost her job and accused me of hitting the children to get her job back, which she did. Do they have a case against me? They have me for a class x felony which is now closed ...

    Jesus’s Answer

    With the limited information you have provided it is difficult to asses whether the State's case is strong enough for a conviction. Meanwhile, you should be aware that testimonial evidence is legally sufficient for a conviction; what you should do is hire a competent criminal defense attorney to investigate and advise you properly. Good luck.

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  • What to expect for a clean background with a first offense as "retail theft over $300'

    clean background, licensed practical nurse, no previous arrests or convictions, was recently arrested for a first time offense of retail theft over $300, was detained with mother and both were charged with retail theft over $300, out on bond (5,00...

    Jesus’s Answer

    You need to fight this charge so that you are not convicted, or you risk losing your nurse license. This is a third degree felony and AHCA will revoke your license forever if convicted. That said, there are always ways to fight this charge. Hire an experienced criminal defense attorney.

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  • Can my brother go to jail when entering the US if he is married to a minor in Cuba?

    My brother is 41 years old, and he is married to a 16 year old girl. They have a son. My mother wants to claim him from Cuba with his wife and son, but she was told by a lawyer that he would go to prison for statutory rape the minute he enters the...

    Jesus’s Answer

    You should tell the lawyer to check F.S. 743. She clearly has had the disability of minority removed by marriage and she is now an adult for almost everything before the law.

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  • Will my brother go to jail when he enters the US for being married to a minor?

    My brother is 41 years old, and he is married to a 16 years old girl. They have a son. My mother is trying to claim all three from Cuba, but a lawyer told her that the minute he enters the US, he will go to jail for statutory rape. Is this true? A...

    Jesus’s Answer

    Even in Florida it is possible to marry a minor, so I doubt that he will face any criminal charges. She clearly has had the disability of minority removed by emancipation.

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  • Can someone who committed a crime a drug on in1988 get back the green card?

    served 4 years i na state prision after went to a lwayewr an d asked t obe deported that was in 1992

    Jesus’s Answer

    • Selected as best answer

    Before 1996 you could apply for 212(c) relief even if it was a drug crime. My firm handled many 212(c) cases back in the day. However, jurisprudence (cases decided by the courts) regarding 212(c) subsequent to 1996 allowed those convicted before the AEDPA to apply for 212(c) waiver, even if it meant theat they could not become U.S. citizens. There may be something to be done in your case, but of course the final answer will depend on the specifics of your case. Contact an experienced immigration attorney. Good luck.

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