Joshoa Emmanuel Sutton’s Guides

Joshoa Emmanuel Sutton

Miami Immigration Attorney.

Contributor Level 8
  1. If I would like to study in the US, what visa do I need?

    Written by attorney Joshoa Sutton, 12 months ago.

    You must have a student visa to study in the United States. There are three visas for foreign students seeking to study in the US: F-1 visa M-1 visa J-1 visa Your course of study and the type of school you plan to attend determine whether you need an F-1, M-1, or a J-1visa. Y...

  2. How Does the Supreme Court's Recent Ruling on the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) Help Gay Couples?

    Written by attorney Joshoa Sutton, about 1 year ago.

    On June 26, 2013 the US Supreme Court decided to allow gay couples to receive federal benefits. This ruling automatically gives immigration benefits to gay couples (1) who want to get married, or (2) who are already legally married. Here are the basics to make sure your partner ...

    4 people found this Legal Guide helpful

  3. Can Information I Share on my DACA Application be used to Deport Me?

    Written by attorney Joshoa Sutton, about 1 year ago.

    This is an important question that every DREAMer should discuss with their immigration attorney. The short answer is that while there is a risk that your information will be shared with ICE officials, for most people the risk is very minimal and is nothing to fear. According to...

    2 people found this Legal Guide helpful

  4. How can a DREAMer get a work permit?

    Written by attorney Joshoa Sutton, about 1 year ago.

    As an immigration attorney, Ive met many young people who were brought to the United States when they were children and now that they have become young adults, they realize that something went wrong with their immigration status. Perhaps their parents didnt bring them into the US...

    3 people found this Legal Guide helpful

  5. How to Prove Your Marriage Is Real

    Written by attorney Joshoa Sutton, about 1 year ago.

    When a citizen of another country marries a U.S. citizen, they immediately become eligible for a two-year Conditional Green Card. The condition the government places on the green card is that the card can be revoked if the government believes that the marriage was not real. At t...

    4 people found this Legal Guide helpful