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Amanda Amy Farahany
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Amanda Farahany’s Answers

40 total

  • What to do if my sexual harasser is the head of the company? He owns it, no human resources, no one above him. Who to go to?

    When your harasser is in a position like this shouldn't he know better? In a situation like this what do you do?

    Amanda’s Answer

    Unfortunately, those at the head of the company often get away with the sexual harassment unless someone steps forward and holds him accountable through the legal process. I would suggest you speak with an attorney about bringing a lawsuit against him, and to record him and start gathering evidence against him. We'd be happy to discuss this with you, if you'd like to call our office at 404-214-0120

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  • What steps should I take?

    I was working for a company doing a great job and never got written up. I got a bonus for bringing money to the company, but the whole 3 months of me working there they were discriminating against me because of my race. They never trained me prope...

    Amanda’s Answer

    As you should! Your employer mistreated you, and it sounds like discriminated against you on multiple basis. I'd be happy to help you with your situation. How many employees work for your company?

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  • Employer withheld commission trying to force me to sign a non-compete clause contract, I resigned- They Still owe me salary.

    Employer withheld commissions as hostage trying to force me into signing a non-compete contract. I resigned however, they still owe me outstanding commissions, they withheld this salary for over 1 year.

    Amanda’s Answer

    You are likely owed your commissions for a breach of contract. In addition, depending on the type of work you did (such as inside sales), you may also have a claim for additional wages owed to you. You should speak to an attorney about your situation.

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  • Can an employer require you to take a one hour lunch break, by mandating you work a 9hour shift?

    For example my boss is requiring my shift change from 7a-3:30p, to 7a-4p by making one hour lunches mandatory and no seperate 15min breaks

    Amanda’s Answer

    As long as you are paid for the time that you work and are not working through your lunch, your employer can require that you work those particular shifts. There is no requirement in Georgia or in federal law that requires the employer to give you breaks.

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  • As an exempt employee, can my supervisor require me to work more than 40 hours? I am requesting to work my 40 hrs only.

    He is requesting I work 1 extra hour per day, Mon-Fri. As an exempt employee, what are my rights?

    Amanda’s Answer

    The first question is whether you are actually an exempt employee. Many people are misclassified and mistakenly believe that if they are paid on a salary basis that they are not entitled to overtime. That said, if you are truly an exempt employee, then the employer can make you work a 45 hour work week. If you are misclassified, then requiring you to work that extra hour each day means you are entitled to overtime for those extra five hours.

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  • Do i have a discrimanation lawsuit.

    I,m a apartment maintanance worker. on my property i am the only maintanance guy. This is the biggest property the company have, yet the other property's have two to three guys. I am the only one thats been required to be on call 24/7 every d...

    Amanda’s Answer

    It sounds as though you likely have a claim against the company. In particular, it sounds like you are not being paid properly either. Are you getting overtime for your on call time? Are you getting paid for your extra time? I'd be happy to discuss your situation with you further. Contact our office at 404-214-0120 and you will be connected to speak with an attorney when you call.

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  • I'm pregnant and was told that the company couldn't accommodate my dr appts. I was told by the h.r manager "this is not cali"

    My dr is an hour away from my job.

    Amanda’s Answer

    Although California does have more protections than Georgia, you still have rights under the federal Pregnancy Discrimination Act (if your employer has more than 15 employees) and under the Family and Medical Leave Act (if your employer has more than 50 employees in a 75 mile radius, and you have worked there more than one year). Under the PDA, the company must accommodate your doctor's appointments the same way they would anyone else who was sick. If they are treating you differently, that is illegal. Under the FMLA, you are entitled to take time off for your doctor's appointments and your job is protected.

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  • Is this workplace retaliation?

    I work for a medical company and was recently harrased and called racial names by the physician. I complained to HR and rescheduled to not work with her again. Since then she has gotten a promotion and nothing was done. I've been with this company...

    Amanda’s Answer

    It sounds like it may be workplace retaliation. Many times, after an employee complains, the employee is subject to a pattern of increased discipline in retaliation for the complaint. You should speak with an attorney directly to see if your situation is illegal. If you contact our firm, you will be scheduled to speak with an attorney on the telephone the day of your call.

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  • My husband works for a property management co. as a maint. tech. He gets paid 2 times a month. He does not get paid OT. Legal?

    Some paychecks he works up to 104 hours....

    Amanda’s Answer

    Your husband is entitled to overtime. We have handled several class actions similar to your husband's situation. Have him call us and we will be happy to help him.

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  • My company re-imaged our center and reopen with someone else in my position is this legal

    all old employees were given a chance to apply for new job position my position was not listed but now that have have reopen they have someone from another center in my position

    Amanda’s Answer

    It depends on the reason that the company put someone else in your position. Was it because of race, gender, national origin, religion or other protected characteristic? If so, replacing you may be illegal. You should first discuss with the company to see why they say your were position was not posted.

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