Erica Nicole Cordova’s Answers

Erica Nicole Cordova

Employee Benefits Lawyer.

Contributor Level 7
  1. I am suing an Independant school district for harassment,retaliation wrongful termination. My lawyer is pushing me to settle

    Answered 11 months ago.

    1. Brian Christopher Tyrone
    2. Erica Nicole Cordova
    3. Steven Robert Samples
    4. Adam Kielich
    5. Thomas J. Crane
    6. ···
    7 lawyer answers

    Ultimately, the decision is completely yours whether or not you want to settle. You have not provided sufficient information/facts to know whether $8k - $10k is on par for cases like yours. That being said, your attorney's role is to advise you on what he or she thinks are your best options. Often, your attorney is better suited to see the big picture without emotional attachment. You should be discussing these concerns with your attorney and perhaps he or she can give you more guidance on why...

    7 lawyers agreed with this answer

  2. Can you sue an employer if they have confessed to discrimination against you?

    Answered 12 months ago.

    1. Erica Nicole Cordova
    2. V. Jonas Urba
    3. Matthew Ian Marks
    3 lawyer answers

    Whether you have a claim depends on the basis of the discrimination. Was it simply a personality issues? If so, you don't have grounds for a claim. If, however, it was related to an injury or disability you have, then it is possible that you may have a claim. If the harassment has caused you to need the anxiety medication, you could possibly have a claim for damages, but again, it depends on whether the harassment was based on your membership in a protected class (race, gender, disability,...

    Selected as best answer

  3. State employee retaliation due to switching to seasonal employment.

    Answered 12 months ago.

    1. Neil Pedersen
    2. Brett A. Borah
    3. Erica Nicole Cordova
    3 lawyer answers

    While discrimination based on an individual's status as a parent (prohibited under Executive Order 13152) is not a covered basis under the laws enforced by the EEOC, there are circumstances where discrimination against caregivers may give rise to sex discrimination under Title VII or disability discrimination under the ADA. See Enforcement Guidance: Unlawful Disparate Treatment of Workers with Caregiving Responsibilities. I would suggest that you speak with a lawyer in your jurisdiction...

    3 lawyers agreed with this answer

    1 person marked this answer as helpful

  4. Is it lawful to receive less of a raise than other employees at same pay level and performance due to being hired @ higher wage?

    Answered 11 months ago.

    1. Erica Nicole Cordova
    2. Rixon Charles Rafter III
    3. Darrel S Jackson
    3 lawyer answers

    Yes, differences in pay & raises are legal as long as it is not discriminatory and not based on your membership in a protected class (i.e. Race, age, gender, disability, etc)

    3 lawyers agreed with this answer

  5. Can an employer breach a confidentiality disability disclosure?

    Answered 12 months ago.

    1. Alexander J. Higgins
    2. Erica Nicole Cordova
    3. Thomas A. Ricotta
    3 lawyer answers

    There are certainly worrying facts in what you have stated above. Your employer could be violating the Americans With Disabilities Act, in addition to other laws such as HIPAA. I would suggest you contact an attorney in your area as soon as possible to discuss this issue.

    3 lawyers agreed with this answer

  6. Do I need an employment attorney for retaliation?

    Answered 11 months ago.

    1. Scott Benjamin Riddle
    2. Erica Nicole Cordova
    2 lawyer answers

    I agree. It does not appear that you have stated any legitimate legal claim, unless the "retaliation" was based on your membership in a protected class.

    1 lawyer agreed with this answer

  7. What arethes laws around religious activities at workplace?

    Answered 12 months ago.

    1. Scott Benjamin Riddle
    2. Erica Nicole Cordova
    3. John Arnold Steakley
    4. Jason Robert Carnell
    5. Letonya Faye Moore
    5 lawyer answers

    From what you wrote, there doesn't appear to be any indication that this employer would try to make you adhere to their religious beliefs. It seems that they simply wanted to notify you that you may see them praying in their private time, which is acceptable. This scenario would me more problematic if, for example, they had told you that you would be expected to pray with them at company activities etc.

    1 lawyer agreed with this answer

  8. Is my boss allowed to terminate me for my hudbands actions at work?

    Answered 12 months ago.

    1. Marcus G. Keegan
    2. Scott Benjamin Riddle
    3. Erica Nicole Cordova
    4. Michael David Myers
    4 lawyer answers

    Generally, in Georgia, employment is "at-will", which means that the employer can terminate you at any time, and for any reason that does not involve unlawful discrimination based on your membership in a protected class (such as race, gender, age, disability, national origin, color). If the harassment had nothing to do with your membership in one of the protected classes (for example, they just don't like you), then your employer can terminate you for your husband's actions. If, however, the...

    1 person marked this answer as helpful

  9. My company hasn't paid me my 2nd qtr bonus, even though it was earned. Can they legally do that? They approved the plan.

    Answered 12 months ago.

    1. Erica Nicole Cordova
    2. Ainsworth G. Dudley Jr.
    2 lawyer answers

    Unless there is documentation stating that you only have to achieve 3 of the 5 components, I would assume that you would have to achieve 5 of the 5 components to be entitled to the bonus. That being said, it does not appear that you "earned" this bonus.

    1 person marked this answer as helpful

  10. Is it legal for me to work 40 hours consistently, and for my employer to consider me part time?

    Answered 11 months ago.

    1. Thomas A. Ricotta
    2. Arthur H. Forman
    3. Erica Nicole Cordova
    3 lawyer answers

    Employers often use more technical language such as "regularly scheduled to work 40 Hours per week" to define eligibility. For example, if you are not "scheduled" to work 40 hours then you are not eligible for the benefits. The employer has discretion to determine who is eligible.

    2 lawyers agreed with this answer