Jason Scott Marcus’s Answers

Jason Scott Marcus

Roswell Fraud Lawyer.

Contributor Level 4
  1. Should I be worried?

    Answered 7 months ago.

    1. Scott Richard Kaufman
    2. Karren Melinda Kenney
    3. Michael Kevin Cernyar
    4. Jason Scott Marcus
    5. Michael Louis Shultz
    6. ···
    7 lawyer answers

    You stole something, the police know it was you, and you should retain a criminal defense attorney immediately. If there current information is not correct, it will not be difficult for them to find out who owns your phone number and track you down.

    5 lawyers agreed with this answer

  2. How much can I sue for?

    Answered about 1 year ago.

    1. Raymond Andrew Grimes
    2. Jason Scott Marcus
    3. Jonathan S Rudnick
    3 lawyer answers

    Generally you would treat this as if the client had not paid you in the first place. If the actual damages are $230, that is going to be your damages, plus court costs, and this would be a good candidate for small claims court. If you have a contract that specifies interest for unpaid invoices, include that. If you don't, your state may have a law that allows pre-judgment interest, so include "with interest" in your complaint. If "dealing with the issue" is not something you would normally...

    3 lawyers agreed with this answer

  3. Is it legal for a doctor to charge a lower price if paying cash and a higher price if filing with insurance?

    Answered 6 months ago.

    1. Jason Scott Marcus
    1 lawyer answer

    This is a standard practice. They are not increasing their fees for insurance; rather they are decreasing their fees for cash. Doctors and insurance companies already have agreed upon rates that the insurance companies have negotiated - that amount will not change. But dealing with insurance companies is costly and time-consuming, so many doctors will accept cash payments at a substantial discount. This also benefits individuals who do not have insurance.

    1 lawyer agreed with this answer

    1 person marked this answer as helpful

  4. I used my dads debit card to buy some movies but I thought I was using my debit card. What should I do?

    Answered about 1 year ago.

    1. John E. Melton
    2. Jamil Kamel Khuja
    3. Jason Scott Marcus
    3 lawyer answers

    You were intending to buy those movies with your own card anyway, right? So you should admit to your father your mistake and pay him back for the movies. No harm, no foul.

    1 lawyer agreed with this answer

    1 person marked this answer as helpful

  5. How can I sue someone who sold me a car ran off with my money and never gave me the car?

    Answered 5 months ago.

    1. Jason Scott Marcus
    1 lawyer answer

    You can only sue him if you know how to find him because you will need to be able to serve him with the lawsuit, and you will ultimately need to be able to collect from him. If he took your money and ran, there isn't too much you can do. If you know how to get a hold of him, then it's a simple matter of filing a lawsuit in state or small claims court and having him served with it. If he's "a dealer", he would seemingly be registered somewhere with an address on record.

    1 lawyer agreed with this answer

  6. Can I seek litigation if I was promised a job under false pretense, including city proof the job would not be there.

    Answered 10 months ago.

    1. Arthur H. Forman
    2. Jeffrey Ira Schwimmer
    3. Thomas Alan Holman
    4. Alan James Brinkmeier
    5. Jason Scott Marcus
    5 lawyer answers

    If you relied on his promise and suffered damages as a result, you may have a cause of action. You will need to contact an attorney.

    1 lawyer agreed with this answer

  7. Is turning in retail store for overcharging (hundreds or thousands of dollars) covered under whistle blower protection law

    Answered 4 months ago.

    1. Athina Karamanlis Powers
    2. Scott Richard Kaufman
    3. Vijay Dinakar
    4. Jason Scott Marcus
    4 lawyer answers

    I do not agree with the previous commenters. It is possible that the state of California has a state-specific whistleblower law that will protect you (I practice in Georgia and do not know). However, I am not aware of any federal statute that would protect you or any standard state law that would protect you. Under the facts as you have described, I do not expect that you will be protected by the federal or California False Claims Acts, which only applies if you are defrauding the federal or...

  8. Do I have a lawsuit?For the fact that they are not holding up their end(myinfo 2 enter drawing)Is this fraud?False advertising?

    Answered 5 months ago.

    1. Jason Scott Marcus
    1 lawyer answer

    You're upset because you were completing a survey for the chance to win a gift card, which clearly stated that the drawing had already occurred, and then they offered you a gift card anyway because you were upset. There is no false advertising or fraud. Take the gift card.

  9. Is there a reward for food stamp fraud?

    Answered 10 months ago.

    1. Robert Jason De Groot
    2. Jason Scott Marcus
    2 lawyer answers

    I'm not aware of a reward simply for reporting food stamp fraud, but one potential route would be to file a False Claims Act case against the convenience store. There are attorneys who specialize in the False Claims Act; you could try contacting one in your area and seeing if they will take your case. Most work on a contingency basis, meaning they only get paid if they win, so it may be worth your time to make some calls. You cannot file a False Claims Act case without an attorney; it will be...

  10. Can I sue craiglist for an item that was being sold on thiere listing but came out to. Be fraud

    Answered 10 months ago.

    1. Maria Alicia Lackey
    2. Dorothea Elaine Laster
    3. Brad Jackson
    4. Jason Scott Marcus
    4 lawyer answers

    It is unlikely that you will be able to establish that Craigslist is liable for fraudulent postings by third parties. Craigslist is not likely to be responsible for the content of the postings or fraudulent dealings resulting therefrom. Its terms of use state as much, that you are proceeding at your own risk and that the website is not responsible. Moreover, if you were to sue Craigslist, its terms of use suggest that you would have to do so in California and that you would be responsible for...