Tracie Lynn Klinke’s Answers

Tracie Lynn Klinke

Marietta Immigration Attorney.

Contributor Level 13
  1. How long after my biometrics appointment will I receive my approval letter?

    Answered over 2 years ago.

    1. Tracie Lynn Klinke
    2. J Charles Ferrari
    3. F. J. Capriotti III
    3 lawyer answers

    I completely understand your frustration, but there's really no good explanation for why some are approved before you. It could simply be a particular officer's caseload. There are still over 120,000 cases waiting for a final review and your file could very well be in there. I would continue to check your case online at www.uscis.gov. Since DACA is so new, there's no way to tell what "average processing times are," but if it's been more than six months, I would talk with an attorney about...

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  2. Does anyone know which Department and Address that the U-Visa is sent to? Who are they working with?

    Answered over 2 years ago.

    1. Tracie Lynn Klinke
    2. Giacomo Jacques Behar
    3. F. J. Capriotti III
    3 lawyer answers

    I-918 U Status applications are processed through the Vermont Service Center. The address is: Vermont Service Center 75 Lower Welden Street St. Albans, VT 05479

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  3. I am a USC. Can my wife become LPR if she entered without inspection?

    Answered about 1 year ago.

    1. Carl Michael Shusterman
    2. Tracie Lynn Klinke
    3. John Qumars Khosravi
    4. Carolina C Gomez
    5. Ekaette Patty-Anne Eddings
    5 lawyer answers

    You've clearly done your research! I would actually recommend doing both. DACA would protect her for two years and she would have a work card. The process for a waiver and consular processing will take a minimum of 18 months. Without knowing more, it does appear that she'll need to go abroad to obtain her immigrant visa. For the waiver and consular process, most all of that time she will be in the US waiting. Why not have DACA so she can live without worry while waiting for the interview in...

    4 lawyers agreed with this answer

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  4. I-130 petition

    Answered over 1 year ago.

    1. Tracie Lynn Klinke
    2. Viera Buzgova
    3. Wendy Rebecca Barlow
    3 lawyer answers

    Currently, we're seeing I-130s take a year to get adjudicated. The average is 11 months. You may be waiting several more months before hearing anything. Good luck!

    4 lawyers agreed with this answer

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  5. Please help, i am asylum seeker , immigration court date has been set for my master hearing.

    Answered over 1 year ago.

    1. Alexander Joseph Segal
    2. Aggie Rachel Hoffman
    3. Tracie Lynn Klinke
    4. Jennifer Sheethel Varughese
    4 lawyer answers

    Every court is a little different, but you will mostly likely submit the I-589 at the master court hearing. Best of luck!

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  6. Who respond for my I864?

    Answered over 1 year ago.

    1. Tracie Lynn Klinke
    2. Alexander Joseph Segal
    3. Alexander M. Ivakhnenko
    3 lawyer answers

    Yes, you will need to do a new I-864 with your new spouse. As the other attorney mentions, you may want to speak with another attorney to make sure everything is in order for your new green card application.

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  7. I-864 or I-864A?

    Answered over 1 year ago.

    1. Carl Michael Shusterman
    2. Alexander Joseph Segal
    3. Dean P Murray
    4. Tracie Lynn Klinke
    4 lawyer answers

    The I-864 is the correct form to use in this circumstance.

    4 lawyers agreed with this answer

    1 person marked this answer as helpful

  8. My husband just found out that his divorce was not finalized. How will this affect my situation as an immigrant?

    Answered almost 2 years ago.

    1. Stanley P. Walker
    2. Giacomo Jacques Behar
    3. Tracie Lynn Klinke
    3 lawyer answers

    Well, there are a few options and you'll probably want to talk to a family law attorney, since marriage laws vary from state to state. In some places, as long as the marriage to the other wife is now terminated, you marriage would be considered automatically valid from the date that it happened. In some other places, you'll need to get remarried to your husband. You won't need to disclose anything to USCIS until it comes time to remove the conditions on your green card - and you'll certainly...

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  9. What should i do please, should i go ahead with it or will this affect my application

    Answered about 2 years ago.

    1. Alexander Joseph Segal
    2. Tracie Lynn Klinke
    3. Andrew Chung
    3 lawyer answers

    I have never seen a situation where the co-sponsors payment issues were a concern for USCIS as a joint-sponsor. The IRS and USCIS don't talk to each other, so as long as your joint sponsor meets the requirements listed on the I-864, it should be okay.

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  10. I have been in America. Since 2000 and got married in 2005 but never filed for my residence since my husband didn't want to he

    Answered about 2 years ago.

    1. Alex R. Hess
    2. Kira Gagarin
    3. Tracie Lynn Klinke
    4. J. Thomas Smith Ph.D.
    4 lawyer answers

    Generally, you need your spouse to help you petition for your green card. If you are no longer together, then that door is closed. However, there may be a way to move forward without your spouse if you were subject to any sort of abuse or cruelty. It's a much more difficult way to get your green card, but if it's an option for you, then it will certainly help. Please, speak with an attorney to see if anything else can be done.

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