Richard S Sternberg’s Answers

Richard S Sternberg

Washington Real Estate Attorney.

Contributor Level 9
  1. If someone pays taxes on an abandoned property can they take possession ?

    Answered 3 months ago.

    1. Richard S Sternberg
    2. Mark Steven Paullin
    3. Ross Cameron Hart
    3 lawyer answers

    No. This is one of my favorite fictions in the Lore of the Law, second only to the predominently Southern concept or Heir Property. Sometimes, if you pay the taxes and a court 21 years later finds that you were still possessing the property openly and adversely, continuously and hostilely to its true owner (and, I'd suggest that paying the taxes means it isn't hostile if the owner knows of it), then you'd have adverse possession after you sued to quiet title. If the title owner claimed it back...

    1 lawyer agreed with this answer

    1 person marked this answer as helpful

  2. Earnest money deposit check bounced

    Answered 7 months ago.

    1. Richard S Sternberg
    2. Leonard Bernard Feld
    2 lawyer answers

    I'd be really interested if you can persuade the police or the AUSA to treat that as a criminal fraud charge. I think you'll need to proceed with counsel as a bounced check or breach of contract case.

    1 lawyer agreed with this answer

    1 person marked this answer as helpful

  3. USA LLC forming subsidiary/branch in CANADA

    Answered over 1 year ago.

    1. Jonathan H Levy
    2. Richard S Sternberg
    3. Luca Cristiano Maria Melchionna
    3 lawyer answers

    You need a lawyer licensed in the appropriate province of Canada. US law is unlikely to be a problem if I understand your question, but it wouldn't hurt to run the Canadian conclusions past a lawyer in the jurisdiction where the US LLC is registered and/or has its principal place of business.

    3 lawyers agreed with this answer

  4. The date of my court trial I was rushed to the emergency room to have a procedure the procedure was caused by the stress of the

    Answered 3 months ago.

    1. Richard S Sternberg
    2. Nicole Whitaker
    3. Jeffrey Ira Schwimmer
    4. Jay Bodzin
    4 lawyer answers

    Sounds to me like you need a lawyer, but it also sounds like you had one. Have you asked him or her to explain and provide you with options?

    1 lawyer agreed with this answer

  5. Want to stop my grandchild's father from coming to my house. his visitation orders says he's not to come, but he won't stop.

    Answered 3 months ago.

    1. Richard S Sternberg
    1 lawyer answer

    If there is a protective order against the father visiting, the police should be enforcing that when he arrives. If they don't, call the station captain. If the order merely binds the other parties, you need to get the order modified or get a new civil protection order. If he hasn't done anything to merit a new protective order keeping him off your property, you might try consulting an attorney about noticing him against trespass.

    1 lawyer agreed with this answer

  6. I sued the city District of Columbia and we settled at out at mediation, how long do they have to send issue the money.

    Answered 3 months ago.

    1. Richard S Sternberg
    2. Sufian Amin Doleh
    2 lawyer answers

    If you have a lawyer representing you in the matter, the proper and best thing for you to do is to ask that lawyer. None of us are permitted to interfere with your attorney-client relationship other than to advise you that you need to talk to your lawyer.

    1 lawyer agreed with this answer

  7. Probating will for assets in US by US expatriate with no USA address

    Answered 4 months ago.

    1. Steven M Zelinger
    2. Richard S Sternberg
    2 lawyer answers

    My colleague is correct that probate occurs in the domicile of the decedent, and I might add that bank and stock accounts generally transfer outside of probate. Thus, upon your demise, the named beneficiary gains access to the funds by presenting your death certificate with no need for Letters of Administration. There may, however, be some tax and Patriot Act reporting involved, much of which could be avoided by using a trust or LLC. I'd need to research that, but I recently had a Virginia...

    1 lawyer agreed with this answer

  8. How do I avoid my home going through probate?

    Answered 7 months ago.

    1. Steven M Zelinger
    2. Richard S Sternberg
    3. Anna Self
    4. Shelley Ann Elder
    5. Ian Thomas Valkenet
    5 lawyer answers

    I see you've received a number of responses, but none of them come from lawyers admitted to practice in DC. In DC, as in many other jurisdictions, you can convey real property by Will, by Deed, or by Trust. Handwritten Wills no longer receive special lenient treatment, so you really need professional help in forming either the Will or the Trust. The trust can be used to avoid probate, but it can also limit your title to the property during your life, especially if crafted incorrectly. There are...

    1 lawyer agreed with this answer

  9. IF BOTH TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY HAVE PASSED IS THE PROPERTY PASSED DOWN TO THE HEIRS WITH OUT A WILL

    Answered 12 months ago.

    1. Ivette M Santaella
    2. Richard S Sternberg
    3. Robert Miller
    4. Michael S. Haber
    4 lawyer answers

    This is a tough one from your description, and, if that is the best description you can write, you really need a local probate lawyer to straighten this out. Let me make some assumptions based on my best reading of your message. Let's assume that the property was in the District and was held by Deed by your mother and father as tenants by the entireties. That is to say that it was purchased or transferred into the entireties when each of the five unities of entireties title were present and...

    1 lawyer agreed with this answer

  10. Reimbursable Executor Expenses, New Jersey

    Answered about 1 year ago.

    1. Gary Roger Waitzman
    2. David Majors
    3. Richard S Sternberg
    3 lawyer answers

    As my learned colleague suggests, this needs to be asked of a New Jersey lawyer. To answer it, the lawyer will need to learn whether you are named in a Will as the executor or whether you are appointed in an intestate estate, and the lawyer may need to see the Will. You might, however, get the answer yourself by calling the Surrogates Court in the appropriate county in New Jersey. The probate clerks tend to be quite helpful in the counties I've seen, and they are used to dealing with pro se...

    1 lawyer agreed with this answer

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