Elizabeth C Koch’s Answers

Elizabeth C Koch

Washington Communications / Media Law Attorney.

Contributor Level 3
  1. Anti - SLAP suit in CA and the law on defamation

    Answered over 1 year ago.

    1. Dennis Morgan
    2. Herb Fox
    3. Elizabeth C Koch
    4. Christian K. Lassen II
    4 lawyer answers

    California's anti-SLAPP statute does not change the fundamental elements of a claim for defamation. But just "comments" -- meaning someone's pure opinion -- is not false and therefore cannot form the basis of a claim. If you think someone has published a false and defamatory statement about you, you should consult an attorney.

    3 lawyers agreed with this answer

    1 person marked this answer as helpful

  2. Defamation of character?

    Answered over 1 year ago.

    1. Christian K. Lassen II
    2. George Costas Andriotis
    3. Elizabeth C Koch
    4. Christian James Gabroy
    4 lawyer answers

    You would not have a claim for defamation since the information that your boss disclosed was true. However, you might have a claim for invasion or violation of the HIPPA statute protecting the privacy of medical information.

    2 lawyers agreed with this answer

  3. Can I sue the police department for defamation of character?

    Answered over 1 year ago.

    1. Christian K. Lassen II
    2. Byron Keith Barclay
    3. Elizabeth C Koch
    3 lawyer answers

    Police officers (and all government workers) generally have immunity from defamation claims arising out of their work, so I think its very unlikely you'd succeed in a defamation lawsuit. If y ou know who theofficers were, you might try making an official complaint to the police department.

    1 lawyer agreed with this answer

  4. Can I be sued for talking about a customer not paying his bills to co-workers at the same office?

    Answered over 1 year ago.

    1. Christian K. Lassen II
    2. Lars A. Lundeen
    3. Elizabeth C Koch
    3 lawyer answers

    In order for you to successfully be sued for defamation, you need to publish a false statement of fact about the person suing you. Generally, speaking to two people is enough to constitute "publication." But if it is true that the customer did not pay his bills, he will not be able to prove that what you said is false. You may also have a "common interest" privilege.