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Stanley Bruce Cheiken
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Stanley Cheiken’s Answers

50 total


  • My daughters boyfriend gifted her with a black lab and now has broken up with her. He is trying to reclaim the dog

    The dog is registered in my daughters name and she also has receipts from vet bills,etc

    Stanley’s Answer

    If it was given as an unconditional gift, the dog belongs to your daughter.

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  • What is the statute of limitations in Pa for requesting an arbitration award be made a civil judgment?

    Arbitration award was made to the collection agency on the creditors behalf in 2011. November 2014 the collection agency is now requesting it be turned into a civil judgment. In PA the SOL is 4 years...is that from original default? The Arbitrat...

    Stanley’s Answer

    There is a 4 year statute of limitations for breach of contract claims in Pennsylvania. The statute begins on the date of the alleged breach. The plaintiff has 4 years within which to file the lawsuit. Once that occurs, the statute of limitations is no longer relevant. In your case, an arbitration award was entered. You had 30 days to appeal from that award and to obtain a trial de novo. Apparently, you did not appeal. As a result, the award became final. Under Rule 1307, the creditor had the right to request that the award be entered as a judgment. There is no deadline for that request. You should speak to a creditor's rights attorney about your options.

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  • Can I sue the NJ Dept. of Labor for denying me a new unemployment claim?

    in their guidelines it says a claim is good for 1 year but it doesn't say that you can't start a new claim before the years is up if you've worked the necessary hours and made the minimum amount of money. They have interpeted it this way but it is...

    Stanley’s Answer

    You can't sue the state. Your remedy is to appeal the decision. You should hire an attorney immediately to preserve your rights.

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  • Contractor not showing up, rarely responds to requests/emails, not meeting agreed on schedule (which is not in the contract)

    small business, new owner, paid $25K of $35K already - only deconstruction done thus far

    Stanley’s Answer

    An attorney would need to examine the contract to give firm advice. But if the contractor is in default, you can declare a breach of contract, terminate the contractor, hire a new contractor to finish the project, and sue the original contractor for the additional funds spent in excess of the first contract. You should contact an attorney to assist you.

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  • If one parent signs an agreement for child custody on a piece of paper drawn up by the other parent isthis document legal and bi

    The mother is the primary gaurdian and the farther is not on the birth certificate except he took a parternaty test and he is the farther

    Stanley’s Answer

    Agreements pertaining to child custody are not legally binding until approved by the Court.

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  • Do I need a lawyer or what?

    I been writing a lot of screen play and I think that I have hit the money jackpot of one of my screen play that I wrote. I truly believe that it will be a true Hollywood banger. $$$. My question is how do I get my movie screen play of production c...

    Stanley’s Answer

    Unless you want your next screenplay to be about how Hollywood robbed you blind on your last screenplay, you should hire an experienced entertainment lawyer. You should consider interviewing 2 or 3 attorneys before you make a decision about who to hire. Good luck!

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  • If i got fired, am i still held to the non-compete i signed

    due to a personal issue that my boss has against me within the last year, he has made every reason in the book to fire me. I was with the company for 13 years, and this past year i worked for a egotistical necrotic mircromanager who is threatened ...

    Stanley’s Answer

    There are numerous issues that a qualified attorney would have to review in order to give you a clear picture of the potential enforceability of your non-compete. That said, there is some case law that supports your view that a non-compete may not be enforced against an employee who has been terminated by the employer. It all depends upon the circumstances of the termination and the threshold question is whether the non-compete is necessary for the protection of the employer's business. I strongly suggest that you contact an attorney to get a complrtr evaluation of your particular situation.

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  • I have a dispute against my employer for back pay. In my position, I'm also privy to financial matters. I want to file a lasuit

    against my employer under seal, for it would be very embarrassing if the info. was made public. It would be in their best interest to settle this without public outrage and a media feeding frenzy. Additionally, I'd like. to file a federal whistleb...

    Stanley’s Answer

    For someone who is interested in keeping your claim out of the public eye, you have a funny way of showing it. Avvo is a public forum. In my opinion, it would be very unlikely to successfully keep your claim under seal based solely upon the likelihood of the company's embarrassment and/or public outrage. You may want to consider using private arbitration as a mechanism for determining your claim. With regard to your question about the US Attorney's Office taking action on a federal whistleblower claim, they generally decline to take action unless there is a very strong public interest for intervening. For more information on such actions, you can take a look at the press releases on the US Attorney's website.

    I strongly encourage you to consult with counsel to help you navigate this complicated area.

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  • Do I have a case against my employer?

    worked at company for 24 years. Work hours were changed and due to childcare issues could not comply. was told if I didn't change hours it would be considered a voluntary resignation. Did not sign anything agreeing to this but my company listed me...

    Stanley’s Answer

    You should definitely speak to an experienced employment attorney to discuss your possible claims.

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  • Can I file a discrimination case if my boss told me that I wouldn't get a job opening in the company because I am pregnant

    then I was laid off a month later

    Stanley’s Answer

    Yes. You should consult with an employmment lawyer as soon as possible to make sure that your rights are preserved.

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