William John Vandenberg’s Answers

William John Vandenberg

Philadelphia Immigration Attorney.

Contributor Level 5
  1. My husband has L 1 visa valid till March 2013,Can he apply for my L 2 extension while i am in India.

    Answered almost 2 years ago.

    1. William John Vandenberg
    2. J Charles Ferrari
    2 lawyer answers

    I agree with Charles that the proper step, if you must travel to India, would be to apply for a new L-2 visa stamp at the nearest U.S. embassy. Even if your husband filed for an extension of your L-2 visa while you're still here, it would be abandoned the moment you left. That would be a waste of time and money. You may be worried about "administrative processing," meaning you might be stuck in India waiting for your visa stamping to be approved. This is always a possibility, especially...

    2 lawyers agreed with this answer

  2. Issue regarding the Temporary protected Status for Syrians

    Answered almost 2 years ago.

    1. Eric M. Mark
    2. Steven Sahag Vosbikian
    3. William John Vandenberg
    4. Yolanda Navarrete
    4 lawyer answers

    Hi! First, go IMMEDIATELY to an experienced immigration attorney. You can in all likelihood at least ask to extend your B2 visitor visa before the 4th. There are likely other options that a good immigration attorney can offer you depending on your personal information and history. Regarding your TPS application, from the facts you gave, you wouldn't qualify. You could withdraw, or answer with the truth. Always tell the truth. I wish you the best, and if we can be of assistance please...

    2 lawyers agreed with this answer

  3. Can a Canadian visiting the United States stay 6 months each visit or 6 months a calendar year?

    Answered over 1 year ago.

    1. Stephen D. Berman
    2. William John Vandenberg
    3. J Charles Ferrari
    3 lawyer answers

    Go see a good immigration attorney. As a Canadian, you generally get 6 months. And you could probably get a 6 month extension after that. But frankly, the more time out of a year you spend here, the more likely the CBP guys are going to question whether you are a true "visitor." "Visiting" more than 6 months a calendar year will often get you stopped, and hard questions asked about where you actually live and what you do here. Good luck! John

  4. HOB stamping questions

    Answered almost 2 years ago.

    1. William John Vandenberg
    2. J Charles Ferrari
    3. Win Chester Eaton
    3 lawyer answers

    No. But maybe it would be a good idea to avoid any unnecessary hassle from CBP at the airport. In 2007, USCIS issued a memorandum setting out that so long as the applicant has a facially valid H-1B visa and an I-797 Approval Notice form the new employer, he should be allowed to enter on the visa from the previous employer. (you may Google the Aytes Memorandum, Validity of Certain Nonimmigrant Visas, July 8, 1997, to read it). So as long as you follow these steps, you should be fine....

    1 lawyer agreed with this answer

  5. What to expect from appointment? Received Immigration and Customs Enforcement form G-56

    Answered almost 2 years ago.

    1. Michael M. Yalovenko
    2. Eric M. Mark
    3. William John Vandenberg
    3 lawyer answers

    I agree with my colleagues: you really need a good immigration lawyer at this point. Do you have any attorney now? If so, did they know of this issue in 1996? It appears that he is back in the USA; how did he come back? Did he use a visitor visa, and not disclose the previous removal? Or did he sneak back in? In any event, your husband MUST go to see ICE; it's an offer you can't refuse. But it doesn't necessarily have to end badly; a good attorney can probably work out a deal...

    1 person marked this answer as helpful

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