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Christopher Edward Ezold
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Christopher Ezold’s Answers

3,705 total


  • I have a question concerning sexual harassment in the work place by my boss to me.

    I live in ansonia ct. I drive handicapped children to school , ive been doing this for five yrs. My company is in bridgeport ct. For some time now my boss makes frequent advances towards me. Its uncomfortable to me. But i go along with it in a fri...

    Christopher’s Answer

    Before I respond to your inquiry, I must state that we have not spoken, I have not reviewed the relevant documents and facts, and I do not represent you. Therefore, my discussion below is not a legal opinion, but is informational only. Finally, my discussion applies only to issues to which Pennsylvania, New Jersey or Federal law applies, unless otherwise specified.

    That being said, you have what appears to be a claim of employment discrimination - hostile environment based on gender. These cases rarely cause a company to 'go under.' However, you have a right not to be subject to that kind of behavior at work. You may also have wage claims for your vacation or sick days. You should speak with an employment attorney in your area ASAP, as these claims resolve more easily if filed quickly and while you are still employed there.

    /Christopher E. Ezold/

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  • Which lawyer is right? Does an unambiguous document constitute objective evidence of the signer's intent?

    2 lawyers I consulted with reviewed the documents. Both of them told me that I am entitled to mandatory trust distributions and that there is no ambiguity in the article that requires this. Even the trustee's lawyer hasn't been able to point to an...

    Christopher’s Answer

    Before I respond to your inquiry, I must state that we have not spoken, I have not reviewed the relevant documents and facts, and I do not represent you. Therefore, my discussion below is not a legal opinion, but is informational only. Finally, my discussion applies only to issues to which Pennsylvania, New Jersey or Federal law applies, unless otherwise specified.

    That being said, this is a trusts and estate law question, not a general lawsuit or dispute question. I will change the practice area of your question to get the attention of the right Avvo attorneys.

    /Christopher E. Ezold/

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  • Please explain what it means to resolve all inferences in favor of the non-moving party on Summary Judgment.

    I have read that in a summary judgment hearing, the judge must resolve all inferences in favor of the non-moving party. Does that mean that the judge does not have authority to accept any inferences whatsoever made by the moving party, even if th...

    Christopher’s Answer

    Before I respond to your inquiry, I must state that we have not spoken, I have not reviewed the relevant documents and facts, and I do not represent you. Therefore, my discussion below is not a legal opinion, but is informational only. Finally, my discussion applies only to issues to which Pennsylvania, New Jersey or Federal law applies, unless otherwise specified.

    That being said, resolving all inferences in favor of the responding/non-moving party means that if there is a disputed fact or inference from a fact, that the court will consider, for the purposes of the motion only, that the disputed fact or inference would be found in the non-moving party's favor at trial. If a fact is not disputed, then the court will not consider it any differently for summary judgment. This means that even when a case is weak, if there are facts that could conceivably be found to be in the non-moving party's favor, the court will let the non-moving party proceed to trial.

    /Christopher E. Ezold/

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  • Did this pharmacy employee violate my privacy rights?

    I just went to a local pharmacy at a grocery store and my mother was in such a rush to see say she was there to not only get her husband's prescription but also mines. I didn't have an up to date insurance card for 2016 so I couldn't get it filled...

    Christopher’s Answer

    Before I respond to your inquiry, I must state that we have not spoken, I have not reviewed the relevant documents and facts, and I do not represent you. Therefore, my discussion below is not a legal opinion, but is informational only. Finally, my discussion applies only to issues to which Pennsylvania, New Jersey or Federal law applies, unless otherwise specified.

    That being said, this is an apparent violation of your HIPAA rights; unfortunately, you do not have a right to sue under HIPAA. You can complain to the store, and you can file a complaint with the government (see link below) - but HIPAA does not provide a remedy for you. You might have a claim under NY state law; you should speak with a NY health law attorney if you feel you have significant damages to prove.

    /Christopher E. Ezold/

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  • What legal options does one have if the client is not paying for the services rendered as a freelancer?

    My wife worked as a freelancer for a month. The client is not paying her due amount (about $2K). She signed the contract for freelancing and also has all proof of work delivered.

    Christopher’s Answer

    Before I respond to your inquiry, I must state that we have not spoken, I have not reviewed the relevant documents and facts, and I do not represent you. Therefore, my discussion below is not a legal opinion, but is informational only. Finally, my discussion applies only to issues to which Pennsylvania, New Jersey or Federal law applies, unless otherwise specified.

    That being said, attorney Brett gave you excellent advice. If your wife was legally an employee (many freelancers are actually employees under the law, regardless of what either the freelancer or the employer say), then she may have a wage claim as well. Going to small claims court is likely the fastest resolution for her.

    /Christopher E. Ezold/

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  • My ex-employer is harassing me.

    I left a company one month back with 2 weeks notice. It was a small consulting company & I was the only technical person wearing many hats serving the clients, maintaining internal stuff also. It was so stressful so I moved on. Within 2 weeks I hi...

    Christopher’s Answer

    Before I respond to your inquiry, I must state that we have not spoken, I have not reviewed the relevant documents and facts, and I do not represent you. Therefore, my discussion below is not a legal opinion, but is informational only. Finally, my discussion applies only to issues to which Pennsylvania, New Jersey or Federal law applies, unless otherwise specified.

    That being said, without knowing the facts of the malfeasance claim(s), it is impossible to tell whether your employer can do anything - however, if the employer's only claim is that you didn't do your job well, you can just ignore and block their emails as there is no legal claim against you for not being a good employee. If they claim you didn't do your work at all, or engaged in intentional or reckless conduct that harmed them, they might have a claim, but such claims are rarely worth pursuing. If you have documents or materials belonging to your employer, return them (with cover letter/FedEx receipt to prove you sent them back), as they could pursue you for their property. Otherwise, this just sounds like a badly-managed business that is taking its frustration out on an ex-employee instead of fixing its problems. If you want a definite answer as to your potential liability, speak with an employment attorney in detail, going over all the facts.

    /Christopher E. Ezold/

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  • Is it still ok for me to work with same client at the different agency in this case? Can they harass me like this?

    I'm a visiting nurse from an agency and upon my resignation, I was told that there was a 90 day non-compete policy which prevents me to work with the same client if I were to go to a new agency. I received a letter from my previous agency's law ...

    Christopher’s Answer

    Before I respond to your inquiry, I must state that we have not spoken, I have not reviewed the relevant documents and facts, and I do not represent you. Therefore, my discussion below is not a legal opinion, but is informational only. Finally, my discussion applies only to issues to which Pennsylvania, New Jersey or Federal law applies, unless otherwise specified.

    That being said, what you describe is a messy situation. Were you aware of the 'fine print' when you signed the timesheets? Did you understand it? Did you believe you had to sign it to get paid what you had already earned? Does the employer have a 'legitimate business interest' in the client it no longer serves (required for the noncompete to be enforceable)? Is your status as a health care provider to the client such that there is a public interest in the noncompete not being enforced? We cannot tell from the facts in your question - and you shouldn't answer these questions here (which is a non-privileged, public forum). You should speak with an employment attorney to determine how to respond to the demand letter.

    /Christopher E. Ezold/

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  • Can I sue him for sexual harassment?

    I am a male and my former boss is a male, prior to going to work for my former boss of 6 years we was friends but after going to work for him ,he began asking me in what I considered a joking way ,he ask me on several occasions if I wanted to ha...

    Christopher’s Answer

    Before I respond to your inquiry, I must state that we have not spoken, I have not reviewed the relevant documents and facts, and I do not represent you. Therefore, my discussion below is not a legal opinion, but is informational only. Finally, my discussion applies only to issues to which Pennsylvania, New Jersey or Federal law applies, unless otherwise specified.

    That being said, what you describe sounds like it would be illegal sexual harassment/hostile environment in violation of federal law (Title VII) and possibly state law. You should speak with an employment attorney in your area to determine whether or how to proceed, and whether you could sue the employer or your friend, or both, and what your damages might be.

    /Christopher E. Ezold/

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  • Is it true? Are they going to take care of her for "free" if she needs medical attention?

    One lady I know had a nurse friend over one time, and she told me, that people over 65 years of age are supposed to get free medical care in florida. Well that was some time, but now it came up as my girlfriend is bringing her mother into US.I tri...

    Christopher’s Answer

    Before I respond to your inquiry, I must state that we have not spoken, I have not reviewed the relevant documents and facts, and I do not represent you. Therefore, my discussion below is not a legal opinion, but is informational only. Finally, my discussion applies only to issues to which Pennsylvania, New Jersey or Federal law applies, unless otherwise specified.

    That being said, you might be thinking of Medicare or Medicaid; Medicare is a federal health care plan for people over 65, Medicaid is a federal health care plan for low income people. Medicaid is not free.

    /Christopher E. Ezold/

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  • Provider is not accept payment plan ...patient can not pay 180$ right now..any legal action for patient?

    Provider is refusing to set up payment plan for patient where patient owes 180$ only. Provider threatens to send it to collection agency and ruin credit score. Can patient do anything legally?

    Christopher’s Answer

    Before I respond to your inquiry, I must state that we have not spoken, I have not reviewed the relevant documents and facts, and I do not represent you. Therefore, my discussion below is not a legal opinion, but is informational only. Finally, my discussion applies only to issues to which Pennsylvania, New Jersey or Federal law applies, unless otherwise specified.

    That being said, this is a debt/collection question, not a health law question. I will change the practice area of your question to get the attention of the right Avvo attorneys. I suspect the answer is that the provider has no obligation to take a payment plan.

    /Christopher E. Ezold/

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