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Christopher Edward Ezold
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Christopher Ezold’s Answers

3,251 total


  • Who should I speak to regarding medical marijuana laws in the state of California?

    I have been afforded the opportunity to enter into a business, which will produce edible marijuana-based products for sale to medical marijuana dispensaries in the state of California. I am unfamiliar w/ the laws pertaining to the purchase, produc...

    Christopher’s Answer

    Before I respond to your inquiry, I must state that we have not spoken, I have not reviewed the relevant documents and facts, and I do not represent you. Therefore, my discussion below is not a legal opinion, but is informational only. Finally, my discussion applies only to issues to which Pennsylvania, Delaware, New Jersey or Federal law applies, unless otherwise specified.

    That being said, this is not the type of subject on which you should do your own legal research. Make an appointment with an attorney with experience in the medical marijuana industry in the state in which the business is located. There are far too many criminal, regulatory and other hurdles to figure you on your own.

    /Christopher E. Ezold/

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  • What are the obligations of an attorney who signs a Consent Order? Or agrees to settlement terms on the court record?

    In NJ, when an attorney negotiates a Consent Order and signs it, is he obligated to make sure his client complies with it? Is he obligated to at least not undermine the terms of the Consent Order? What is the attorney supposed to do when his clie...

    Christopher’s Answer

    Before I respond to your inquiry, I must state that we have not spoken, I have not reviewed the relevant documents and facts, and I do not represent you. Therefore, my discussion below is not a legal opinion, but is informational only. Finally, my discussion applies only to issues to which Pennsylvania, Delaware, New Jersey or Federal law applies, unless otherwise specified.

    That being said, attorney Popovich gave you excellent advice. The attorney is the client's representative only, and is not responsible for the client's actions.

    /Christopher E. Ezold/

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  • What is my next step in the harassment problem?

    At my work there is another employee that has been harassing me to the point where he threatened by life to other employees. I filed a harassment claim at work and got other employees testimony. It's still being reviewed but they haven't fired him...

    Christopher’s Answer

    Before I respond to your inquiry, I must state that we have not spoken, I have not reviewed the relevant documents and facts, and I do not represent you. Therefore, my discussion below is not a legal opinion, but is informational only. Finally, my discussion applies only to issues to which Pennsylvania, Delaware, New Jersey or Federal law applies, unless otherwise specified.

    That being said, a threat to your person or life is a serious thing, and you don't need to wait for your employer to act. If it is a real, credible threat, report it to the police. You may want to speak to an employment attorney first in order to ensure you take necessary steps to protect your job at the same time. Do not wait, however - the longer you wait, the less seriously the police will take it.

    /Christopher E. Ezold/

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  • Can a bonus be pay for overtime?

    I worked for a company for over 5 years and for the last 2 and a half I was told I'm a salaried employee and I don't get overtime. We work 6 days a week at a minimum of 9 1/2 hours a day

    Christopher’s Answer

    I am an attorney licensed in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and the States of Delaware and New Jersey. My practice includes employment, business and health care law. Before I respond to your inquiry, I must state that we have not spoken, I have not reviewed the relevant documents and facts, and I do not represent you. Therefore, my discussion below is not a legal opinion, but is informational only. Finally, my discussion applies only to issues to which Pennsylvania, Delaware, New Jersey or Federal law applies.

    That being said, a bonus is not overtime pay. If the employer is required to pay you overtime under the Federal Fair Labor Standards Act, then you are owed the overtime, times two, plus attorneys' fees. There is a short time period to sue, and your right to sue for unpaid wages from two years ago may be slowly going away. Speak with an employment attorney ASAP.

    /Christopher E. Ezold/

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  • An ex spouse of mine passed away in 2010..And i later was told she had contracted a blood disease* cont below*

    How whom or where can i get that info? Its been 5yrs and that i may have been infected by her* i had a relationship w/her from 2005-2009* if this is not held in privacy? Or cannot be obtained or found out? Disregard this*

    Christopher’s Answer

    I am an attorney licensed in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and the States of Delaware and New Jersey. My practice includes employment, business and health care law. Before I respond to your inquiry, I must state that we have not spoken, I have not reviewed the relevant documents and facts, and I do not represent you. Therefore, my discussion below is not a legal opinion, but is informational only. Finally, my discussion applies only to issues to which Pennsylvania, Delaware, New Jersey or Federal law applies.

    That being said, the information may not even be in existence, depending on the provider and what information is being requested. Your best bet is to speak with your own physician; not all blood-related diseases are communicable, and there are tests to determine if you have such diseases. If you are suffering no symptoms after all this time, I suspect you have nothing to worry about.

    /Christopher E. Ezold/

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  • Can you sue a community mental health provider for an employee who is a therapist who Disregarding client confidentiality?

    A Therapist sent client text that they are family to client former spouse and former spouse second wife and client was never aware or knew of Therapist relationship prior to Therapist sending the text to client and client have been in therapy with...

    Christopher’s Answer

    I am an attorney licensed in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and the States of Delaware and New Jersey. My practice includes employment, business and health care law. Before I respond to your inquiry, I must state that we have not spoken, I have not reviewed the relevant documents and facts, and I do not represent you. Therefore, my discussion below is not a legal opinion, but is informational only. Finally, my discussion applies only to issues to which Pennsylvania, Delaware, New Jersey or Federal law applies.

    That being said, the text indicates a conflict of interest issue, but doesn't indicate that confidentiality was breached. Did the therapist disclose any information to the former spouse or another person? If not, then there is likely no claim. If there was a breach, Pennsylvania state law might provide a remedy, depending on (a) the facts of the breach and (b) the damages you suffered from it, if any. If so, speak to a health law attorney to determine how to proceed.

    /Christopher E. Ezold/

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  • Need break H1b contract agreement from my employer

    Actually i need to stick with them for 24 months..i already passed 12months with them.hey saying Under damage of Breach:"company shall be entitled to seek any and all damages allowed under law aginst employee"..i have new employer to transfer my H1b

    Christopher’s Answer

    I am an attorney licensed in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and the States of Delaware and New Jersey. My practice includes employment, business and health care law. Before I respond to your inquiry, I must state that we have not spoken, I have not reviewed the relevant documents and facts, and I do not represent you. Therefore, my discussion below is not a legal opinion, but is informational only. Finally, my discussion applies only to issues to which Pennsylvania, Delaware, New Jersey or Federal law applies.

    That being said, this raises a lot of immigration issues and is more properly an immigration law question; I'll change the practice area to immigration to get the attention of the right Avvo attorneys.

    /Christopher E. Ezold/

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  • What legal action should I take for a violation of Compliance/HIPPA?

    The Financial Clearance department at Aurora Health Care shared my balance with my Physical Therapists Clinic while telling them that they were not to treat me any more until payment arrangements have started. This is against Aurora's own Complian...

    Christopher’s Answer

    I am an attorney licensed in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and the States of Delaware and New Jersey. My practice includes employment, business and health care law. Before I respond to your inquiry, I must state that we have not spoken, I have not reviewed the relevant documents and facts, and I do not represent you. Therefore, my discussion below is not a legal opinion, but is informational only. Finally, my discussion applies only to issues to which Pennsylvania, Delaware, New Jersey or Federal law applies.

    That being said, you do not have a private right of action under HIPAA, nor for a violation of a health care providers' compliance policies. You can file a complaint with the Office for Civil Rights (link below), but there is no guarantee it'll be acted on, and if it is, you won't get anything out of it. What you describe does not sound like a HIPAA violation, as the sharing of information for the purposes of obtaining payment is a permissible use, but that depends on the facts of the situation. The use of facsimile could be a problem for the entity.

    /Christopher E. Ezold/

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  • Employer/employee information: Pennsylvania

    Me and my roommate work together we'll my roommate is my general manager. I feel like since things been going on at home I've been a target at work, we have no communication at home. I was terminated for pulling my cell phone out from my back pock...

    Christopher’s Answer

    I am an attorney licensed in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and the States of Delaware and New Jersey. My practice includes employment, business and health care law. Before I respond to your inquiry, I must state that we have not spoken, I have not reviewed the relevant documents and facts, and I do not represent you. Therefore, my discussion below is not a legal opinion, but is informational only. Finally, my discussion applies only to issues to which Pennsylvania, Delaware, New Jersey or Federal law applies.

    That being said, I'd say you are likely to get it, but it will depend on the testimony at the hearing. You may want to get a lawyer to ensure your chances are maximized. Evidence that you had an out-of-work dispute, and the circumstances of your phone issue will be critical; evidence that you were not warned about the issue, and that others handle their phones, or even text, at work will also be very useful to show it's not an enforced policy, a violation of which should have been a fireable offense.

    /Christopher E. Ezold/

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  • A male referee (sports official) was suspended by his association for entering a male locker room. No wrongdoing took place.

    Is he being profiled, unjustly, in the atmosphere of Jerry Sandusky? Does he have legal recourse, as no criminal sanctions were levied -- just a suspension from that association?

    Christopher’s Answer

    I am an attorney licensed in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and the States of Delaware and New Jersey. My practice includes employment, business and health care law. Before I respond to your inquiry, I must state that we have not spoken, I have not reviewed the relevant documents and facts, and I do not represent you. Therefore, my discussion below is not a legal opinion, but is informational only. Finally, my discussion applies only to issues to which Pennsylvania, Delaware, New Jersey or Federal law applies.

    That being said, not enough information; was the referee allowed or disallowed by policy to be in the locker room? What was the behavior in the room? Witnesses? What was the reason for being in the room? It is unlikely the association will have liability, although the referee may want to attempt to get a nondisparagement agreement in place.

    /Christopher E. Ezold/

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