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Christopher Edward Ezold
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Christopher Ezold’s Answers

3,253 total


  • What should I do about employee harassment at work and after I reported it to the director of nursing im still being taunted by

    I was at work when a employee asked if she could talk to me I said sure but when we got outside she didn't want to talk she wanted to confront me about another employee who is her friend And she said with a angry demeanor what is my problem with t...

    Christopher’s Answer

    Before I respond to your inquiry, I must state that we have not spoken, I have not reviewed the relevant documents and facts, and I do not represent you. Therefore, my discussion below is not a legal opinion, but is informational only. Finally, my discussion applies only to issues to which Pennsylvania, Delaware, New Jersey or Federal law applies, unless otherwise specified.

    That being said, attorney Madison gave you excellent advice. It appears that an employee has been claiming you have engaged in inappropriate behavior toward her; if that is not true, you may want to get HR involved to get ahead of the issue. Speak with a TX employment attorney to determine how to proceed.

    /Christopher E. Ezold/

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  • I got injured at work through supervisory negligence which I prove. I have all the proof. I need a lawyer in my area

    company violated their operational and safety policies and proceedures after bringing it to mgmts. attention verbaly and in writing through the procces of grievances (28), violations kept happening which resolted in repeted injuries. Also have...

    Christopher’s Answer

    Before I respond to your inquiry, I must state that we have not spoken, I have not reviewed the relevant documents and facts, and I do not represent you. Therefore, my discussion below is not a legal opinion, but is informational only. Finally, my discussion applies only to issues to which Pennsylvania, Delaware, New Jersey or Federal law applies, unless otherwise specified.

    That being said, this is a workers' compensation matter; you can use the "Find a Lawyer" button, above, to find an Avvo attorney to assist you.

    /Christopher E. Ezold/

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  • Can I demand the salary I was told in a signed salary increase letter?

    Can I demand a higher salary I was told in a salary increase letter? A year ago I was given a signed salary increase letter stating my new salary effective July 1. Yesterday I noticed a discrepancy in our system with my salary amount, and upon inq...

    Christopher’s Answer

    Before I respond to your inquiry, I must state that we have not spoken, I have not reviewed the relevant documents and facts, and I do not represent you. Therefore, my discussion below is not a legal opinion, but is informational only. Finally, my discussion applies only to issues to which Pennsylvania, Delaware, New Jersey or Federal law applies, unless otherwise specified.

    That being said, unless you have a contract that states your pay cannot be changed, your employer can change your pay going forward, without notice or good reason. The employer cannot do this retroactively (for time you've already worked). Since the pay raise starts July 1, and you haven't worked under the new pay structure, the employer can change your pay. It may not be good management or policy, or even right, but it is not illegal.

    If the pay raise was offered as an inducement to stop you from leaving or taking an action like reducing your hours, etc., you might have a claim of quasi-contract or justifiable reliance, These are fairly rare, however.. I suspect your best course is to either (a) negotiate this with your employer, or (b) if you can no longer trust them, look for a new job while taking the lesser raise. Again, this may not be right, just not illegal.

    /Christopher E. Ezold/

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  • Is a non-notarized handwritten signed agreement enforceable and valid in PA?

    My father obtained and paid off my student loans. All loans were in his name. He had me sign a paper saying I would pay him back with a specific payment amount and interest amount. I can no longer afford the payment. Is the document enforceabl...

    Christopher’s Answer

    Before I respond to your inquiry, I must state that we have not spoken, I have not reviewed the relevant documents and facts, and I do not represent you. Therefore, my discussion below is not a legal opinion, but is informational only. Finally, my discussion applies only to issues to which Pennsylvania, Delaware, New Jersey or Federal law applies, unless otherwise specified.

    That being said, an agreement does not need to be notarized to be valid, but it must comply with the statute of frauds and law regarding general contract formation. Your contract may not be valid, but not for lack of notarization. Handwritten and signed agreements are valid contracts assuming they meet legal requirements. Even if it is not, your father may have a quasi-contract claim that he detrimentally relied on your promise to repay him, and put himself in debt for your benefit. You should speak to your father about changing the terms of repayment to ones you can afford, instead of trying to escape the debt altogether - or declare bankruptcy. Speak with an attorney to determine the best course of action and to have your contract reviewed.

    /Christopher E. Ezold/

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  • Is this discrimination or job retaliation?

    If an employer is aware that an employee's work is suffering due to a domestic abuse situation in their home life, is it discrimination to fire them. If an employee's spouse/significant other made what could be considered threatening statements ...

    Christopher’s Answer

    Before I respond to your inquiry, I must state that we have not spoken, I have not reviewed the relevant documents and facts, and I do not represent you. Therefore, my discussion below is not a legal opinion, but is informational only. Finally, my discussion applies only to issues to which Pennsylvania, Delaware, New Jersey or Federal law applies, unless otherwise specified.

    That being said, unfortunately, it is not illegal. New Jersey, as in most states, is an 'at-will' state - this means that an employer can fire you without notice, for any reason or no reason (except certain discriminatory or retaliatory reasons). Terminating you because your spouse has made threats against the employer is not illegal. You may have a claim against the spouse for tortious interference with contract. You should look into support groups that will assist you in finding services and aid to leave. Good luck.

    /Christopher E. Ezold/

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  • Should a person that owns a home and has retirement start their own business as a sole proprietor or should they go LLC

    I'm wanting to join an already established LLC. that would want me to be a sole proprietor. But I can just start my own business and form an LLC. I don't want to put what little I have in jeopardy if something went bad with the relationship.

    Christopher’s Answer

    Before I respond to your inquiry, I must state that we have not spoken, I have not reviewed the relevant documents and facts, and I do not represent you. Therefore, my discussion below is not a legal opinion, but is informational only. Finally, my discussion applies only to issues to which Pennsylvania, Delaware, New Jersey or Federal law applies, unless otherwise specified.

    That being said, if protection of personal assets is your primary concern, then you should either join an established entity or form your own. However, the corporate form does NOT act as a total shield against liability. You should ensure you have the right insurance to cover any potential liabilities, and a good accountant, business attorney and insurance broker to act as your advisory 'team' to help walk you through some of the issues you'll face in starting and conducting a business. Your question indicates you're being asked to join an existing LLC; there are some risk issues here, as well. You should speak with a business attorney to determine the risk level you are facing and the best route for you to follow.

    /Christopher E. Ezold/

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  • Hw to dissolve a 50/50 Delaware LLC, on a template operating agreement and prevent full ownership to estranged partner?

    Partner has become estranged and silent due to a few disagreements. Reason for dissolving is because it is just not financially viable anymore. Whatever value the company has experienced is because of my efforts, i have been paying for all the fix...

    Christopher’s Answer

    Before I respond to your inquiry, I must state that we have not spoken, I have not reviewed the relevant documents and facts, and I do not represent you. Therefore, my discussion below is not a legal opinion, but is informational only. Finally, my discussion applies only to issues to which Pennsylvania, Delaware, New Jersey or Federal law applies, unless otherwise specified.

    That being said, attorney Messa gave you excellent advice. The first question that comes up in my mind is, if the company is insolvent and/or not financially viable, why do you want to prevent your partner from retaining any interest in the company? Is it financially worth any legal fight that might ensue to close the company out through a judicial dissolution? You will need to speak with an attorney to determine how to proceed.

    /Christopher E. Ezold/

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  • Do I have any legal recourse?

    I was just laid off from a job that I relocated for. I moved to NJ on my own dime and found out on wed 6/17/15 that our office would be closing on 6/19/15. I was never told this job was temporary and therefore signed a 1 year lease at my apt compl...

    Christopher’s Answer

    Before I respond to your inquiry, I must state that we have not spoken, I have not reviewed the relevant documents and facts, and I do not represent you. Therefore, my discussion below is not a legal opinion, but is informational only. Finally, my discussion applies only to issues to which Pennsylvania, Delaware, New Jersey or Federal law applies, unless otherwise specified.

    That being said, this is a terrible situation. Although New Jersey is an 'at will' state that lets employers fire employees at any time, without notice, for any reason (except discriminatory or retaliatory reasons), you may have a claim if the company's conduct created an 'implied contract' - that is, a contract by conduct implying you would be employed for a minimum amount of time or not terminated without cause. This is a complicated area of law; speak to an employment attorney ASAP and do NOT sign anything your employer gives you until your attorney has reviewed it.

    /Christopher E. Ezold/

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  • Can I sue my work?

    I worked at Wendy's past an was sexually harassed was told " I would be fired if didn't sleep with him" I told the other manager an he fired him but main manager fired me first. A few years later I seen the same people not working there so I reApp...

    Christopher’s Answer

    Before I respond to your inquiry, I must state that we have not spoken, I have not reviewed the relevant documents and facts, and I do not represent you. Therefore, my discussion below is not a legal opinion, but is informational only. Finally, my discussion applies only to issues to which Pennsylvania, Delaware, New Jersey or Federal law applies, unless otherwise specified.

    That being said, if you were rehired and not fired since, you may have no claim. If you were rehired and then fired due to the 'do not hire list' you may have a claim for retaliation - speak to an employment attorney ASAP, as you rights expire quickly.

    /Christopher E. Ezold/

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