Jeffrey Mead Kurzon’s Answers

Jeffrey Mead Kurzon

New York Business Attorney.

Contributor Level 9
  1. If an entertainer cannot be present for the event they are under contract for, do they have to provide some equal to them?

    Answered over 1 year ago.

    1. Jeffrey Mead Kurzon
    2. Marc Jacobson
    3. Alan James Brinkmeier
    4. Bruce E. Burdick
    4 lawyer answers

    If you suffered harm, you should consult an attorney to see what your potential remedies are. Absent other facts, this seems like a pretty straightforward contract dispute.

    8 lawyers agreed with this answer

  2. How to get out of an LLC on legal zoom

    Answered over 1 year ago.

    1. Mark Michael Campanella
    2. Jeffrey Mead Kurzon
    3. Marco Caviglia
    4. Anne Marie R. Segal
    5. Michael C. Wild
    5 lawyer answers

    You should request from your partners a copy of the LLC agreement to know the terms and conditions of the operating agreement, which is the document that governs the relation between you as a member vis-a-vis the other members and the company. I would be happy to assist you with this. Feel free to contact me to make an appointment to speak.

    7 lawyers agreed with this answer

  3. How to change from multi member LLC to single member LLC? the LLC was first set up as a multi member but took on no partners...

    Answered over 1 year ago.

    1. Jeffrey Mead Kurzon
    2. David Tuan Nguyen
    3. Jeffrey Kevin Davis
    4. Christopher Michael Larson
    4 lawyer answers

    Generally you prepare K-1 statements for partners in an LLC. With no partners, no K-1s. Tax software such as Turbotax should be able to help you or can discuss with your accountant. Legally now, you need a single member operating agreement, which is a pretty standard agreement (but important to help protect the LLC's limited liability status) that any business attorney should be able to help you with fairly easily.

    6 lawyers agreed with this answer

  4. How to tell if someone is using your identity to start/own a company?

    Answered over 1 year ago.

    1. Jeffrey Mead Kurzon
    2. Matisyahu Wolfberg
    3. Michael Charles Doland
    3 lawyer answers

    You sound a bit paranoid. If someone used your social security number for an unlawful purpose and makes false representations to the IRS, they are most likely breaking all sorts of laws, including criminal. Then again, you are not paranoid if someone is really watching you. I am not sure, but perhaps you could send the IRS a Freedom of Information Act request to determine if anyone has unlawfully used your social security number to obtain an EIN.

    5 lawyers agreed with this answer

    1 person marked this answer as helpful

  5. Does a business have to declare all monies received

    Answered over 1 year ago.

    1. Jeffrey Mead Kurzon
    2. Umit Mike Gursoy
    3. Amanda Marie Cook
    4. Christopher Michael Larson
    4 lawyer answers

    What kind of business? And what kind of monies? Certainly you should declare all taxable income to the IRS. Perhaps certain exceptions apply (e.g. maybe you do not need to declare a "gift"), but you should discuss this with a qualified tax attorney or tax advisor (which I am not).

    5 lawyers agreed with this answer

  6. What are my liabilities for monthly rent after resigning from a corporation?

    Answered over 1 year ago.

    1. Jeffrey Mead Kurzon
    2. Richard J. Chertock
    3. Jayson Lutzky
    4. Marisa Andrea Corvisiero
    5. Roman Leonov
    5 lawyer answers

    No written rental agreement? All agreements with respect to real estate need to be in writing in New York. Who is the owner of the space? You may be able to wiggle out of this depending on the facts and how your partners and the landlord react. Assuming the potential liability is anything but negligible, you should get an attorney. And the next time you start a business with fellow shareholders, hire an attorney to draft a shareholders agreement for you. Do not be penny wise and pound foolish.

    5 lawyers agreed with this answer

  7. Do you give free contract advice

    Answered over 1 year ago.

    1. Jeffrey Mead Kurzon
    2. Eric Edward Rothstein
    3. Yefim Rubinov
    4. Bradley Ross Siegel
    5. Eric Stepanov
    5 lawyer answers

    No.

    5 lawyers agreed with this answer

  8. I signed a retainer with a lawyer

    Answered over 1 year ago.

    1. Jeffrey Mead Kurzon
    2. Matisyahu Wolfberg
    3. Robert John Murillo
    3 lawyer answers

    You should discuss this with your new lawyer and if he/she is any good, they will be able to help you. It is the client's right to choose who represents them. You should also be able to get back unused portions of your retainer.

    5 lawyers agreed with this answer

  9. Can personal debt and collectors come after my S corp?

    Answered over 1 year ago.

    1. Jeffrey Mead Kurzon
    2. Glen P. Malia
    3. Andrew Richard Edward Gale
    3 lawyer answers

    Your shares in your corporation are personal property. Without bankruptcy protection, those shares should be subject to seizure by your creditors but they would probably need a court order and that would be costly for them. I am not a bankruptcy attorney, but I would think your creditors would be happy that you have started a business and are trying to make money to pay them back. Best thing to do in my opinion is to communicate with them and let them know what you are doing your best to try...

    5 lawyers agreed with this answer

  10. I signed a contract with a vendor to provide some services but I want out. There's nothing in the contract that speaks to that.

    Answered almost 2 years ago.

    1. Jeffrey Mead Kurzon
    2. Robert A. Stumpf
    3. Harry N. Konst
    4. Pamela Koslyn
    4 lawyer answers

    You should review the agreement with an attorney. If that seems economically untenable based on factors you have not added in your question (e.g. size of the contract), then suggest that you discuss openly with your vendor, offer to pay for the five hours, but say that you do not want their services anymore because you are unhappy with them. Also, as a hindsight is 50/50 remark, always better to have attorneys review contracts before you sign them.

    4 lawyers agreed with this answer

    1 person marked this answer as helpful