Allan E Richardson’s Answers

Allan E Richardson

Woodbury Employment / Labor Attorney.

Contributor Level 14
  1. What can a person do if their attorney pressures them into a sexual relationship while representing them?

    Answered over 1 year ago.

    1. Raymond George Wigell
    2. Judy A. Goldstein
    3. Allan E Richardson
    4. Elizabeth Granoff
    4 lawyer answers

    Contact the bar's disciplinary committee immediately. This behavior is unexcusable. Second, demand your file from her and take it elsewhere for a second opinion to determine whether this attorney committed malpractice. (Always bear in mind that a an ethical breach, by itself, does not ordinarily amount to malpractice.) Be prepared to pay for this review. I am not licensed in Illinois and my comments should not be taken as legal advice.

    6 lawyers agreed with this answer

    1 person marked this answer as helpful

  2. Is it legal to compensate employee this way?

    Answered 2 months ago.

    1. Allan E Richardson
    2. Christopher Edward Ezold
    2 lawyer answers

    As my colleague points out, there are a couple of statutes you need to concern yourself with that are particular to the health industry. Depending on whether these people are, in fact, professionals as the law defines it, you may also have a concern under the FLSA (where titles don't matter). A lurking concern is this, though: Are you encouraging your doctors to give patients short shrift when "seeing patients" is more important than treating them? If that is the impression you leave, you could...

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  3. I am filing a labor lawsuit against my former employer. i have a forensic accounting background and I discovered massive

    Answered 8 months ago.

    1. Hanan M Isaacs
    2. Allan E Richardson
    3. Ross Begelman
    4. Robert J Adams Jr.
    4 lawyer answers

    You need to make two investments. First, make an investment of time and thought to put together a detailed account of what happened and when, specifying who was involved by name and title. Preferably, you should put this together in chronological order. You will need this to organize your thoughts both for your meeting with an attorney and to refresh your recollection during any resulting case. Second, invest in a consultation with an experienced employment lawyer. Especially since your case is...

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  4. A case or not a case?

    Answered about 1 year ago.

    1. Philip Douglas Cave
    2. Allan E Richardson
    3. Christine C McCall
    4. Alec Scott Rose
    4 lawyer answers

    My colleagues have provided useful responses to this question, but let me add a little more insight. A big part of a decision to take a case is the impression a potential client makes and my assessment of how that will play in front of a jury. For example, if the potential client has face tats and visible piercings, I can almost guarantee that I won't take the case, no matter how strong the facts are, because most jurors will be turned off. My feel for how the client and I will get along for...

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  5. My company, ABC Co. has shut down and my employer has asked me to work for the sister company, DEF. My contract is with ABC Co.

    Answered 8 months ago.

    1. Allan E Richardson
    2. Leonard Roy Boyer
    3. Michael T Warshaw
    3 lawyer answers

    As a general rule, if you have a green card, you have the right to stay here and work anywhere that will employ you. Having said that, it would be well worth your time to consult with an experienced employment lawyer to see just what your contract says because even if the company can't get you deported, there may be a clause in your contract that could cause you difficulty. Many attorneys, myself included, will review documents sent via email and engage in a phone consult, payable via credit card.

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  6. Can a former employer give negative feedback?

    Answered over 1 year ago.

    1. Alix R. Rubin
    2. Allan E Richardson
    3. Christopher Edward Ezold
    4. Herbert J Tan
    4 lawyer answers

    In general, yes, so long as the negative feedback is truthful. A prudent employer will limit information on a former employee to beginning and end dates, position held and, often, salary, but there is no legal requirement limiting them to that scant information.

    4 lawyers agreed with this answer

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  7. My lender sent me a letter saying I had been denied a mortgage loan because I am receiving Social Security Disability.

    Answered over 1 year ago.

    1. Edward George Hanratty
    2. Allan E Richardson
    3. Brian S Wayson
    3 lawyer answers

    Based on the limited information you supplied, you may have a claim under the Fair Housing Act and possible under the New Jersey Law Against Discrimination. I suggest you invest in a consultation with an attorney who is experienced in discrimination claims. An employment lawyer may be your best bet because most claims of discrimination arise in the employment setting. Good luck.

    4 lawyers agreed with this answer

    1 person marked this answer as helpful

  8. Can an employer make me sign a non-compete after giving notice for resignation?

    Answered over 1 year ago.

    1. Allan E Richardson
    2. Jonathan Ian Nirenberg
    3. Christopher Edward Ezold
    3 lawyer answers

    Yes, you can say no. Your employee can terminate you on the spot if you do, though. What you might want to consider is telling them you will sign it if they make it financially worth your while. Good luck.

    4 lawyers agreed with this answer

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  9. If a non-compete doesn't specify a time length, does that mean it is enforceable forever?

    Answered over 1 year ago.

    1. Allan E Richardson
    2. Alix R. Rubin
    3. Christopher Edward Ezold
    4. Syrion Anthony Jack
    5. Robert John Murillo
    5 lawyer answers

    New Jersey looks on non-competes with disfavor, but will enforce them if they are reasonable as to geographic scope, duration and subject matter, that is, the type of business. A perpetual bar would be unreasonble and no court would enforce that. New Jersey, hoever, will blue pencil such an agreement and make a time limit tht is reasonable if the balance of the document is enforceable. For review of such a document, you don't need a nearby atorney. I routinely review contracts sent to me via...

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  10. I just gave my 2 weeks and my employer let me go that day. I am in the state of NJ. Am I eligible for unemployment, severence?

    Answered over 1 year ago.

    1. Alix R. Rubin
    2. Allan E Richardson
    3. Fred S Shahrooz-Scampato
    3 lawyer answers

    For at will employees such as you appear to be, there is no legal requirement to be paid severance. Some companies provide severance as a matter of policy or through contract, but that is a private matter, not one of law. Likewise, the company is under no obligation to agree to let you work out the notice period, unless there was some agreement in place beforehand. As to unemployment, file for it and explain how you came to be unemployed. Make it clear you did not quit. You may qualify. Good luck.

    4 lawyers agreed with this answer

    1 person marked this answer as helpful