Jeffrey L Crown’s Answers

Jeffrey L Crown

Rocky Hill Trusts Attorney.

Contributor Level 12
  1. I want to close my revocable trust. my bank wants to charge me $1500 if i do. if its my money how can they.?

    Answered about 3 years ago.

    1. Jeffrey L Crown
    2. Eliz C A Johnson
    2 lawyer answers

    Atty. Johnson is correct in that there is generally no fee to close out a bank account and that revoking a revocable trust should also be free of costs. Banks sometimes try to impose a "termination fee" when they're being removed as a trustee. Is the bank a trustee and are they trying to do this? If they are, did they provide you with a fee schedule which clearly states that there would be a termination fee? We've sometimes been able to have these fees abated by a court when we're removing a...

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  2. Can a lawyer in CT create a will for a client in North Carolina? Do they need to have a license in North Carolina?

    Answered over 1 year ago.

    1. Kevin Burns
    2. Steven M Zelinger
    3. Jeffrey L Crown
    4. Scott J. Wittlin
    4 lawyer answers

    I'm a Connecticut lawyer, and do not know North Carolina law. With that caveat, here are some thoughts. Many states,including CT, have a "borrowing statute". The CT statute, which is fairly typical, provides that a will validly executed in another jurisdiction is valid here. The caveat is that, although a will may be valid under a borrowing statute, language used in a will in state "A" may have a different meaning in state "B." Your CT lawyer should probably consult with North...

  3. Lack of trustee

    Answered about 3 years ago.

    1. Jeffrey L Crown
    2. Jerry E Shiles
    2 lawyer answers

    I can't cite cases without doing the research. I've practiced exclusively trust and estate law for almost 40 years and can assure youthat this is what lawyers call "Black Letter Law." It is a universally accepted principle of trust law that is applicable in all common law jurisdictions. Jeffrey L. Crown Trustlawyer, LLC Rocky Hill, CT

  4. Trust

    Answered over 3 years ago.

    1. Jeffrey L Crown
    2. Eliz C A Johnson
    3. Steven J. Fromm
    3 lawyer answers

    Let's take your question apart and answer it in order. Giving a trustee the discretion to distribute assets at any time is fairly common. Most of the time, trustees are given "standards," under which to exercise their discretion. These standards include making distributions for a beneficiary's "health, education, maintenance and support" [commonly referred to as "ascertainable standards"] and others, such as "comfort," "general welfare" and "happiness." These are "non-ascertainable...

  5. Does an Executrix have the power to prevent a beneficiary named in a will access to personal papers of the deceased?

    Answered over 3 years ago.

    1. Christopher G Brown
    2. Jeffrey L Crown
    3. Steven J. Fromm
    3 lawyer answers

    Threatening you with arrest is extreme. You might want to ask the Probate Court to schedule a "status conference" at which the executor has to appear. The executor owes duties of care to the beneficiaries and any creditors. She cannot unilaterally deny you access to your father's personal papers. You should contact a lawyer who spends most of his or her time on estate and trust issues and ask him or her to speak with the executor's lawyer. If that conversation isn't fruitful, then your...

  6. Vesting in Connecticut

    Answered over 3 years ago.

    1. Scott D Rosenberg
    2. Jeffrey L Crown
    3. Henry C. Weatherby
    3 lawyer answers

    This provision is called a "power in trust.' It applies when an asset vests in someone who is under age 21. I'm assuming that the draftsman of this will provided that, after a grandchild's lifetime, his or her share would pass to his or her then living issue. The words "then living:" are important if any grandchild has predeceased his or her parent. Assuming that, when a grandchild died or dies, none of his or her children were deceased or that the draftsman used the words "then living,"...

  7. Will and Trust

    Answered over 3 years ago.

    1. Jeffrey L Crown
    2. Henry C. Weatherby
    3. Marlene Sue Seltzer
    3 lawyer answers

    Atty. Seltzer is correct. In CT, there is a published list of unclaimed assets. These assets are essentially in a "pre-escheat" account. The owner can make a claim for them. If they are unclaimed within a specified period of time, they then escheat to the state. To see whether you have any assets on the unclaimed list, go to: http://www.state.ct.us/ott/aboutucp.htm Good Luck Jeffrey L. Crown Trustlawyer, LLC Rocky Hill, CT LEGAL DISCLAIMER Atty. Crown is licensed to...

  8. A question about a will

    Answered over 3 years ago.

    1. Scott D Rosenberg
    2. Jeffrey L Crown
    2 lawyer answers

    I hope that this helps regarding "nominee registration." Suppose a bank or a brokerage owns securities as trustee of many trusts. If the securities were registered in the names of the separate trusts, it could be hard to transfer them because transfer agents might want evidence of the trustee's authority. To eliminate this problem, a corporate trustee may create a "nominee" to hold those securities. For example, First Big Bank creates a nominee called Trustco. Trustco could hold...

  9. Statute of Limitations.

    Answered over 3 years ago.

    1. Jeffrey L Crown
    1 lawyer answer

    I don't know whether I understand your question. If there was a will, then the estate is not "intestate." I hope that this somewhat general information is helpful. When someone petitions the probate court to open an estate, the court sends notice to all of the"heirs." Those are the people who would receive the assets if there were no will. The court then schedules a hearing on opening the estate and, if no one objects, issues a decree appointing the executor or administrator....

  10. Trustee

    Answered over 3 years ago.

    1. Christopher G Brown
    2. Scott D Rosenberg
    3. Jeffrey L Crown
    3 lawyer answers

    You appear to have done some research on trust law. The merger doctrine applies if ALL of the interests in a trust, both present and future, legal and equitable, are held by the same person. As long as there is at least one remainderman or a class of remaindermen who take after the trustee/beneficiary's lifetime, the merger doctrine does not apply. Under Sec. 45a-175 of the Statutes, a beneficiary of an inter-vivos trust can petition the probate court to order the trustee to file an...

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