Jeffrey L Crown’s Answers

Jeffrey L Crown

Rocky Hill Trusts Attorney.

Contributor Level 12
  1. What are the rights of the surviving children when a parent, who has remarried, dies?

    Answered over 3 years ago.

    1. Jeffrey L Crown
    2. Brian J Ladouceur JR
    3. Jonathan Craig Reed
    3 lawyer answers

    Under Connecticut law, if a person dies without a will and has children by a prior marriage, the children inherit 50% of the probate estate [solely owned assets that do not pass by beneficiary designation or under "transfer on death" or "pay on death" designations.) If someone has a will, there is no requirement of CT law that they leave any assets to their children. If you feel that you were left out of a will because your father "forgot" about you or if you believe that he did not have...

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  2. After dad/grandparents passing I've been named as a beneficiary in a family owned home and the other shareholders refuse to sell

    Answered 5 months ago.

    1. Kevin Burns
    2. Jeffrey L Crown
    3. Tina Ann Locasto
    4. Joseph Jonathan Brophy
    4 lawyer answers

    I agree with the other lawyers regarding a "partition." I just want to explain to you what a "partition" is. An owner of a partial interest in real property can bring an action in the superior court to have the property appraised and sold at a public sale. You have an absolute right to do this. Please understand that this procedure may be expensive and, if it goes all the way to a sale, might not bring the best price. As one of the other lawyers pointed out, it could open the door...

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  3. I got a yes and a no answer last time. i'll ask again, do connecticut wills need to be notarized??

    Answered over 4 years ago.

    1. Jeffrey L Crown
    2. Michael D Fox
    2 lawyer answers

    Hello: I'll try to elaborate a bit on my previous answer. The reason that lawyers use "self proving affidavits" on wills is to avoid being required to have the witnesses appear when the client dies. Without that affidavit, the court could demand the presence of the witnesses, or affidavits executed by them, to establish that the requirements of the Statutes were met when the will was executed. That "self proving affidavit" can be signed by either a notary or by a lawyer, acting as a...

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  4. What kind of hard proof is needed to contest a will for undue influence?

    Answered over 3 years ago.

    1. Jeffrey L Crown
    2. Thomas Michael Bates
    3. Alan James Brinkmeier
    3 lawyer answers

    It is generally very dificult to prove undue influence by direct evidence. Rather, it is shown by facts and circumstances surrounding the decedent at, or around, the time that he or she executed the will. The more that you can "pin badges of undue influence" on the alleged infuluencer, the better your case will be. Among these "badges," are creating a relationship of dependence or fear that the decedent would be abandoned; isolating the decedent from his family members; having the will...

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  5. Removal of Trustee?

    Answered over 3 years ago.

    1. Jeffrey L Crown
    2. Scott D Rosenberg
    3. James Oberholtzer
    3 lawyer answers

    The answer depends in part on whether the trust was created under will or under agreement. If the trust was created under will, the Probate Court has jurisdiction to remove a trustee under Section 45a-242 of the CT Statutes. If the trust was created by agreement, there might be a way to bypass a court if the agreement provides a mechanism to remove trustees. Otherwise, you could go to court under the same statute. That statute essentially has two parts. The first part requires that the...

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  6. How can I find out if I was a beneficiary or in my father's will?

    Answered almost 3 years ago.

    1. Jeffrey L Crown
    2. Arthur Harold Geffen
    3. Kelly M. Shovelin
    3 lawyer answers

    When someone dies, the Probate Court has to notify his or her heirs if an application is made to open an estate. your half sister could have been asked by the lawyers for your address in order to have the notice sent to you. You can contact the Probate Court in the county in which your father lived to see if an application has been made to open an estate. If someone has filed an application with a will, you can ask the court for a copy of the will. If you're not satisfied with the...

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  7. How do you begin to contest a will? What are the odds of success? What kind of evidence do we need to contest a will?

    Answered about 1 month ago.

    1. Paul H Begemann
    2. Joseph Michael Pankowski Jr
    3. Jeffrey L Crown
    4. Timothy Edward Kalamaros
    4 lawyer answers

    Before we get into the issues, there is one thing you must do. You have to have the probate court hearing on the admission of the will postponed until you have obtained a lawyer. As the others have said, you should hire a trust and estate lawyer with experience in will contests. Let's deal with your initial questions. You begin a will contest by offering evidence at the hearing on the admission of the will as to your mother in law's lack of capacity and undue influence. The hearing [or...

    1 lawyer agreed with this answer

  8. Can a probate judge subponea a copy of the will from the attorney who created it.

    Answered 2 months ago.

    1. Jeffrey L Crown
    2. Michael S. Haber
    3. Ivette M Santaella
    3 lawyer answers

    Let's start with the issue of a copy of a will vs. the original will. If an original will can't be found, and if it was in the hands of the testator [will maker], there is a presumption that he or she revoked it. This presumption can be overcome, but it requires substantial evidence. We had a copy admitted after a trial where it was proven that the woman had put the will in her pocketbook, placed the pocketbook on the roof of her car and drove off. Admitting a copy of a will over objection...

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  9. Will an attorney in CT represent a party in a contested will on a contingency? estate value over 2 mil.

    Answered 2 months ago.

    1. Harold Ralph Burke
    2. Jeffrey L Crown
    3. Andrew Giles Freda
    4. Michael S. Haber
    4 lawyer answers

    As the other lawyers have stated, fee arrangements depend on the facts of the case. We've done them on a contingent basis where we have "very good facts." At the other end of the spectrum, we've done some with more difficult facts on a hourly basis. Sometimes we make "blended" arrangements, a lower hourly rate against a possible contingent fee. Will contests present unique challenges not present in other types of litigation. For more information, please visit our website, www.trustlawyer....

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  10. If I have a Power of Attorney from my wife, can I represent her in court if she is Pro Se on a civil suit to collect a debt.

    Answered over 3 years ago.

    1. Christopher G Brown
    2. Jeffrey L Crown
    3. David LeBron McGuffey
    4 lawyer answers

    Absolutely not ! ! The words "pro se" mean "for himself." You can speak for yourself in court, but not for anyone else. A power of attorney does not give you the right to represent someone in court unless you are admitted to the bar. Jeffrey L. Crown Trustlawyer, LLC 21 New Britain Avenue Rocky Hill, CT 06067 860-257-4330 www.trustlawyer.com

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860-257-4330