William J Mcleod’s Answers

William J Mcleod

Boston Bankruptcy Attorney.

Contributor Level 11
  1. Summons to pay condominium fees to the association for a property in foreclosure.in Ma.

    Answered about 4 years ago.

    1. Christopher Joseph Fein
    2. William J Mcleod
    2 lawyer answers

    That you already received a discharge is a good thing. The bad thing however, is that you already received your discharge (and I'm assuming it was a chapter 7 discharge). Under Section 523(a)(16) of the US Bankruptcy Code, condo fees that accrued after you filed your case while the property was still in your name are NOT dischargeable even if you expressed an intent to abandon the property. You should speak with your attorney about this - and it might be wise for you to seek out new counsel...

  2. I have a kay's account and they checked my credit without my consent when I made a purchse...

    Answered about 4 years ago.

    1. William J Mcleod
    1 lawyer answer

    Read your credit agreement and disclosures more carefully. When you signed up for the account, you gave them permission to check your credit. It is standard practice for creditors who issue credit to check their consumer's credit reports from time to time.

  3. Do medical bills affect my credit report in the state of Massachusetts?

    Answered about 4 years ago.

    1. Theodore Lyons Araujo
    2. William J Mcleod
    3. Christopher W. Vaughn-Martel
    3 lawyer answers

    I am aware of no limitation on any medical provider to report delinquent accounts. In addition, even if medical providers do not report delinquencies, you can and should assume that collection agencies may, debt buyers will, and if you are sued for the debt, any record of that suit in a public forum will eventually find its way to your creditor report. If you're having problems with your debt, you should speak with an attorney who can assist you and give you the best advice and counsel...

  4. I received a summons for a debt. Filed an answer and now the law firm wants to settle. Should I follow thru with the court date?

    Answered about 4 years ago.

    1. Kara O'Donnell
    2. Jonas A Jacobson
    3. William J Mcleod
    3 lawyer answers

    The prior response is spot-on. Talk to a lawyer. The fact that the firm wants to settle does not mean you can ignore court deadlines or hearings. Settlement discussions and on-going litigation are two different paths - with two different issues. So be sure you attend court hearings, and be sure you stay in contact with the plaintiff/creditor's law firm until you have spoken with counsel. Good luck, Bill McLeod McLeod Law Offices, PC Boston

  5. Being sued by chase credit card company for non payt. Haven't finished interrogatories and discovery due today what can I do?

    Answered over 4 years ago.

    1. James Riley Hodder
    2. Christopher W. Vaughn-Martel
    3. William J Mcleod
    4. Theodore John Koban
    4 lawyer answers

    Why are you doing this without an attorney? If you're being sued, and you're responding to discovery requests, and you're overwhelmed by it all, you should be speaking with an attorney about your options. If you truly have no money for an attorney, contact the Volunteer Lawyers Project of the Boston Bar Association. The link is below. Good luck, Bill McLeod

  6. What is the fee for a lawyer to file bankruptsy

    Answered over 4 years ago.

    1. Christopher W. Vaughn-Martel
    2. Jonas A Jacobson
    3. William J Mcleod
    3 lawyer answers

    You're not buying a TV - you're getting debt relief. But like TVs, you get what you pay for. Remember, if someone is trying to sell you a diamond ring that is worth 10 cents, chances are, they are hoping you'll buy something that isn't worth a dime. You should be able to get some fee quotes from attorneys in your area based on (1) the complexities presented by your case; and (2) your objectives and goals. There is no "one size fits all" approach to bankruptcy, and just because someone...

  7. Can a lien be put on my house for a credit card discharge?

    Answered over 4 years ago.

    1. Kara O'Donnell
    2. William J Mcleod
    2 lawyer answers

    The short answer is yes - but they have to sue you first - meaning, they have to initiate a legal proceeding in court. If your debt is such an issue that you're concerned about the impact it may have on your home, I strongly urge you to speak with an attorney who can discuss your options. The earlier you do so, the more time you have to think about your options. My website has a blog that provides some information you might helpful. The link is below. Good luck, Bill McLeod

  8. How should I handle my brother-in-law's SOS request to take over his debt-ridden business.?

    Answered over 4 years ago.

    1. Henry Lebensbaum
    2. William J Mcleod
    2 lawyer answers

    If I am reading this correctly, it seems as if your brother in law's attorney has suggested that he "sell" the company to a "trusted party" so he can still basically run the business while buying time from creditors. And your brother in law knows he might have to file personal bankruptcy as well. This sounds like a whole of bunch of trouble just waiting to happen. The advice your brother in law may be getting is good for him (although that's arguable, at best), but it's not likely to be...

  9. After 341 meeting

    Answered over 4 years ago.

    1. Kara O'Donnell
    2. Theodore Lyons Araujo
    3. William J Mcleod
    3 lawyer answers

    Actually, you will get your discharge (1) when you complete your course in Debtor Education and file your certificate of completion with the Bankruptcy Court; and (2) when the deadline to object to discharge/dischargeability has passed. The deadline for that will appear on the docket - although creditors and trustees have been known to seek and obtain extensions if the facts warrant it. If both of these things have occurred (certificate filed and deadline expired), the discharge should...

  10. Oral agreement in civil court

    Answered over 4 years ago.

    1. William J Mcleod
    2. Phil A. Taylor
    3. Matthew A. Kane
    3 lawyer answers

    There's not a lot of facts here to go on. Clearly, while you say there was never an agreement, the plaintiff in this matter does not agree. That disagreement is likely what gives rise to the law suit. I recommend taking the time and speaking with an attorney who can get all of the facts and details. Gather your documents and other evidence that you believe proves your defense, and contact a lawyer before the deadline to respond to the complaint expires. Good luck, Bill Mcleod