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Gregory Romanovsky

Gregory Romanovsky’s Answers

311 total


  • How to adjust an expired F1 visa if recently married to a US citizen?

    I am a citizen born in the US and married my girlfriend just a week ago. We have a 2 year old daughter together born in Boston. My wife is currently a college student but her student visa expired before I could apply for a via status adjustment. B...

    Gregory’s Answer

    Assuming she is otherwise eligible for adjustment of status and not subject to any grounds of inadmissibility, you should be able to adjust her status in the United States. The general rule is that you have to be in valid non-immigrant status in order to adjust your status in the U.S., but there is an exception for immediate relatives of U.S. citizens.

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  • Please see my 3 questions above

    I am an Iranian muslim and have a 2-year conditional green card that I got through marriage and I need to apply for removing the condition in a couple of months. I'm happily married and have evidence that our marriage is bona fide. Recent changes ...

    Gregory’s Answer

    Thank you for your inquiry. The recent changes do not apply to your particular situation. That being said, any applications you file will be considered and adjudicated by human beings who may have a certain bias, given the difficult times we live in. I strongly suggest that you obtain legal representation for both your removal of conditions case and your citizenship application.

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  • My husband is sponsoring me for a green card. How soon can I sponsor my 19 year old son for a green card?

    I applied to get a green card through my husband. He is a U.S. citizen. I have a 19 year old son from a previous marriage. How soon can I apply for him to get a green card?

    Gregory’s Answer

    If your son was 19 at the time you got married, he is not considered your husband's 'child' for immigration purposes. This means that the husband cannot petition for your son, and you will have to petition for your son when you get your green card. There are several important considerations (including timing and your son's current status in the U.S.), which makes it critical for you to consult with an experienced immigration attorney as soon as possible.

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  • Thank You.

    I am a U.S citizen. I married my husband 5 years ago. He is Brazilian. He entered the U.S. through Mexico (paid coyotes to help him cross the border). He has never left the United States since coming here. Some time ago, I filed an I-130. Recentl...

    Gregory’s Answer

    From your question, it appears that you're not working with an experienced immigration attorney on your husband's case. This case is far too complex to be handled on your own. I suggest that you speak with an immigration attorney as soon as possible.

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  • Delayed on response

    Hi. I filled the application form to remove conditions on Residence (Form I-751) a year ago. On June/2015 I received a letter asking for more evidence of a good faith marriage, which was sent on September/2015, since then I have not heard from...

    Gregory’s Answer

    Assuming you're still living in a marital union with your U.S. spouse, your best bet would be to file for naturalization (you can do that even if your I-751 is still pending). This will push the case forward.

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  • How can I fix my immigration status with my husband.. Is there anything else we can do..

    Married to USC for over 3yrs..Our 1st I-485 was denied.. We appeal and it was still denied.. We reapply a year ago and got a response yesterday that they intend to deny it again.. They don't think our marriage is bona-fide.. Even though we've file...

    Gregory’s Answer

    If your marriage is real, it is not hopeless. You just need to get yourselves an experienced immigration attorney to save the case.

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  • Am I Eligible to Apply for Naturalization?

    I have been a permanent resident of the US for several years and I am considering applying for US citizenship. However, as I was going through the Naturalization Eligibility Worksheet on the USCIS website I saw that item 10 states the following: “...

    Gregory’s Answer

    From your description, it appears that you did not live in the U.S. between the ages of 18 and 26 (which is all that matters for the Selective Service issue). Therefore, this will not be a problem, and no explanation is needed.

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  • Out of status

    My wife is permanent resident of US and she put petition for me as a spouse visa and i am in US on student visa right now. We got i-130 approved and my priority date is April 2015 so it takes around 6 month to be current and college told me that y...

    Gregory’s Answer

    If you fall out of status, you will be ineligible for adjustment based on your wife's I-130 petition (given that she's an LPR and not a U.S. citizen). That being said, based on the recent visa bulletin (http://travel.state.gov/content/visas/en/law-and-policy/bulletin/2016/visa-bulletin-for-december-2015.html), you may be able to file for adjustment much sooner than in 6 months. You really need to speak with an experienced immigration attorney not mess up your immigration history.

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  • Non-immigrant Visa for wife outside the state? Is that the fastest way to bring her here?

    I heard Non-immigrant visa is process fast than the immigrant visa - green card application. How can I apply for that for my wife? On the USCIS site I only see I-130, Petition for Alien Relative. see the right path?

    Gregory’s Answer

    If you would like to sponsor your wife for permanent residence, an I-130 petition is, in fact, the form that you will need to submit. Whether she will go through consular processing or adjustment of status will depend on different factors you will discuss with your immigration attorney.

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  • A CAC in US right now. Wanna get married with USC BF. Don't want to apply for a fiancé visa and go back to Canada.Any solutions?

    As a Canadian Citizen, I can stay in the US legally 6 months per year, on a visitor visa. Been here in the US for more than a month now. I was on TN visa for about 6 months before that. Then got laid off. Returned to Canada a couple of times.Got m...

    Gregory’s Answer

    Theoretically, you can get married and process your permanent resident application without leaving the U.S. In reality, there are many potential issues, including the pre-conceived intent someone else already mentioned, the validity of your divorce according to the Massachusetts laws, etc. etc.
    I understand you are trying to save money, but you should at least get a consultation, so that an experienced immigration attorney can take a look and evaluate your case.

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