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Asker
Posted over 1 year ago.

I'm about ready to file a lawsuit and subpoena whatever documents the school is keeping by myself! I can't afford a lawyer at the moment.

How about a little more details. Like what information the university is obligated to provide me with, or if I'm due an appeals process -- which the university is denying me!

I've been the victim of a series of attempts by this student and their posse of "friends" to damage my reputation in any way possible -- be it with my peers, the faculty, or the university.

After all their attempts failed, they coarsened the weakest of their bunch to play the "damsel in distress," saying only that they felt "threatened." You see, there's what they say to the administration and what openly say to everyone else.

I hope you understand that I'm under siege! There's no indication that they'll stop here, or if they'll continue to make more false reports. Stopping one won;t be enough, I need to send a message that doing this could cost them what they're trying to take from me!

This is anything but a routine "dispute" and far from any "misunderstanding." This is sabotage! I hope you have something more SUBSTANTIAL to offer besides "get a lawyer!"

Thank you.

Christine C McCall
Christine C McCall, Administrative Law Lawyer - Pasadena, CA
Posted over 1 year ago.

I don't for a moment consider your problem "routine" or a "misunderstanding." In fact, I think I called it "dangerous." But, that said, you are clearly operating under some very problematic misinformation about the nature of your legal rights and what legal recourse may be available to you. "Filing a lawsuit" only works to solve your problem if it is a lawsuit that will be effective and successful. Now, for your own sake, calm down and take the most critical and powerful action that is available to you: get a lawyer. A lawyer will be able to privately and confidentially identify and evaluate your options and your best moves for legal success. You need MORE than what can be offered here, and you need it to be provided to you within the legal confidentiality of an attorney-client relationship.