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Asker
Posted almost 2 years ago.

I have read most of the links and it seems like only if police was called then they prosecute. Do you have experience dealing with clients who were specifically prosecuted by Urban Outfitters?

William David Umansky
William David Umansky, Criminal Defense Attorney - Orlando, FL
Posted almost 2 years ago.

It has been a while but i believe i have and the police were called if I recall correctly. Good luck! I would retain a seattle lawyer just in case.

William A. Jones Jr.
William A. Jones Jr., Criminal Defense Attorney - Wexford, PA
Posted almost 2 years ago.

Sorry for jumping in, but I followed the link which ended up simply being the first page of a Google search for shoplifting and Urban Outfitters. Not sure what it demonstrates about what Urban Outfitters will do in this young person's case. I confess I didn't spend long with the resulting links because I don't know who is posting this stuff and what their agenda is. There's no doubt that some of it originates with the "law firms who specialize in cranking out the civil demand letters that fuel this scam. In any event if an attorney licensed in WA wishes to disagree with me on the basis of local familiarity, I have no problem with that. Sorry maybe I missed the meat of your link.

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Asker
Posted almost 2 years ago.

that was my thought too. I have also researched a lot on everyone else's case regarding shoplifting from Urban Outfitters and it appears that no one mentioned being prosecuted which is giving me some hope.

William A. Jones Jr.
William A. Jones Jr., Criminal Defense Attorney - Wexford, PA
Posted almost 2 years ago.

Apart from questions from kids (no offense to you) wanting to know when the can have sex without getting arrested this is the most popular question we see on AVVO. I have seen lawyer responses telling that some state' have passed laws pertaining to the retailers suing civilly for statutory damages (apparently available even if the subject property is recovered in re-sellable condition) and also being able to include as damages in the suit attorney's fees. Now that last part is significant because otherwise no attorney would take the suit for a percentage of three or four hundred dollars. Indeed lawyers love statutes that provide for the recovery of attorney's fees. Problem is I have yet to see a post from an attorney who has claimed to have witnessed the use of such laws to actually sue on these cases. The civil demand letter IS NOT a lawsuit. If that were to happen you would know about it, and at that point consulting with an attorney would make total sense. The absence of police involvement in you case strongly leads me to believe that you do not have to worry about a criminal charge or criminal history. In any event the two things are separate and not connected in any way. You've obviously done a fair amount of Internet research on this topic, so I'm going to give you a link to a legal guide on this subject prepared by an attorney who participates here who practices in Illinois by the name of Judy Goldstein. I think it's a great presentation on the subject. Actually she turned it into a guide on her profile at my suggestion because she had repeated the same answer so many times, and I sometime had trouble coming up with a reference to one of those answers when I was responding. Anyway here it is: www.avvo.com/legal-guides/ugc/should-i-p Again good luck don't worry and after your done with the link give it a rest.